paradigm

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par·a·digm

 (păr′ə-dīm′, -dĭm′)
n.
1. One that serves as a pattern or model.
2. A set or list of all the inflectional forms of a word or of one of its grammatical categories: the paradigm of an irregular verb.
3. A set of assumptions, concepts, values, and practices that constitutes a way of viewing reality for the community that shares them, especially in an intellectual discipline.

[Middle English, example, from Late Latin paradīgma, from Greek paradeigma, from paradeiknunai, to compare : para-, alongside; see para-1 + deiknunai, to show; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Paradigm first appeared in English in the 1400s, meaning "an example or pattern," and it still bears this meaning today: Their company is a paradigm of the small high-tech firms that have recently sprung up in this area. For nearly 400 years paradigm has also been applied to the patterns of inflections that are used to sort the verbs, nouns, and other parts of speech of a language into groups that are more easily studied. Since the 1960s, paradigm has also been used in science to refer to a theoretical framework, as in a new paradigm for understanding diabetes. This usage was acceptable to 91 percent of the Usage Panel in our 2009 survey. Applications of the term in other contexts show that it can sometimes be used more loosely to mean "the prevailing view of things." The Usage Panel also accepts these nonscientific extensions. In 2009, 74 percent accepted the sentence The paradigm governing international competition and competitiveness has shifted dramatically in the last three decades. This represents a dramatic increase over the 48 percent that accepted the same sentence in 1993.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

paradigm

(ˈpærəˌdaɪm)
n
1. (Grammar) grammar the set of all the inflected forms of a word or a systematic arrangement displaying these forms
2. a pattern or model
3. a typical or stereotypical example (esp in the phrase paradigm case)
4. (Philosophy) (in the philosophy of science) a very general conception of the nature of scientific endeavour within which a given enquiry is undertaken
[C15: via French and Latin from Greek paradeigma pattern, from paradeiknunai to compare, from para-1 + deiknunai to show]
paradigmatic, paradigmatical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

par•a•digm

(ˈpær əˌdaɪm, -dɪm)

n.
1. a set of all the inflected forms of a word based on a single stem or root, as boy, boy's, boys, boys'.
2. an example serving as a model; pattern: a paradigm of virtue.
[1475–85; < Late Latin paradīgma < Greek parádeigma pattern; <paradeiknýnai to show side by side =para- para-1 + deiknýnai to show]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

paradigm

1. a declension, conjugation, etc. that provides all the inflectional forms and serves as a model or example for all others.
2. any model or example. — paradigmatic, paradigmatical, adj.
See also: Grammar
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paradigm - systematic arrangement of all the inflected forms of a word
inflection, inflexion - a change in the form of a word (usually by adding a suffix) to indicate a change in its grammatical function
2.paradigm - a standard or typical exampleparadigm - a standard or typical example; "he is the prototype of good breeding"; "he provided America with an image of the good father"
example, model - a representative form or pattern; "I profited from his example"
concentrate - a concentrated example of something; "the concentrate of contemporary despair"
imago - (psychoanalysis) an idealized image of someone (usually a parent) formed in childhood
3.paradigm - the class of all items that can be substituted into the same position (or slot) in a grammatical sentence (are in paradigmatic relation with one another)
category, class, family - a collection of things sharing a common attribute; "there are two classes of detergents"
4.paradigm - the generally accepted perspective of a particular discipline at a given time; "he framed the problem within the psychoanalytic paradigm"
perspective, view, position - a way of regarding situations or topics etc.; "consider what follows from the positivist view"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

paradigm

noun model, example, original, pattern, ideal, norm, prototype, archetype, exemplar He was the paradigm of the successful man.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

paradigm

noun
One that is worthy of imitation or duplication:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
paradigma
paradigmavzor
maailmankatsomusparadigma
paradygmat
vzor

paradigm

[ˈpærədaɪm]
A. Nparadigma m
B. CPD paradigm shift Ncambio m de paradigma
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

paradigm

nMusterbeispiel nt; (Gram) → Paradigma nt; paradigm shift (Pol) → Paradigmenwechsel m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

paradigm

[ˈpærəˌdaɪm] nparadigma m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The Trust has embarked on its own conceptual scheme which will evolve, as the Trust will.
(2017) conceptually analyzed the natural resources and property right regimes, as some twenty years ago a conceptual scheme of arranging property right regimes and differences among various bundles of rights were determined by Schlager and Ostrom (1992).
Taipei Railway Restaurant manager Liu I-hang said the Five Phases Vegan bento presents a colorful meal box including five colors white, green, black, red and yellow, which is equivalent to the five elements from the Chinese fivefold conceptual scheme: wood, fire, earth, metal, and water.
Analyze the problems faced by the design of the automatic replacement device for vulnerable parts, define the design requirements, and get the innovation problem; use the technology contradiction resolution theory to analyze the device as a whole and get the conceptual scheme; use the contradiction resolution theory and the object-field model to solve the structural design plan for each mechanism, and get the detailed scheme; obtain the institutional design scheme and combine the designer's experience to judge the feasibility; if not feasible, improve the scheme; obtain the overall design layout of the organization and evaluate it.
Based on the 'urbanization cycle conceptual scheme' of urban processes, which conceives of the urbanization, suburbanization and reurbanization stages in the cycle, Manila is now experiencing the reurbanization phase characterized by intensifying urban renewal activities in the city center.
Heraclitus and Thales' Conceptual Scheme: A Historical Study
Its repetition throughout the text highlights its importance in Raunig's conceptual scheme, and would have thus benefited greatly from a more thorough and extended discussion.
Contrast that to the common Western conceptual scheme of the person in motion, surging toward the future and leaving the past behind.
The other conceptual scheme involves social levels: Foias joins a growing cohort of scholars who understand political processes to have involved not only rulers and their retinue but also more common folk.
That this piece, The effect of its past and the cause of its future, also resembled a collection of kindergarten toys seemed aptly bathetic within the exhibition's purposefully overreaching conceptual scheme.

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