concretion

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con·cre·tion

 (kən-krē′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of concreting into a mass; coalescence.
b. The state of having been concreted: a concretion of seminal ideas in her treatise.
2. A solid hard mass.
3. Geology A rounded mass of mineral matter found in sedimentary rock.
4. Medicine A solid mass, usually composed of inorganic material, formed in a cavity or tissue of the body; a calculus.

con·cre′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.

concretion

(kənˈkriːʃən)
n
1. the act or process of coming or growing together; coalescence
2. a solid or solidified mass
3. something made real, tangible, or specific
4. (Geological Science) any of various rounded or irregular mineral masses formed by chemical precipitation around a nucleus, such as a bone or shell, that is different in composition from the sedimentary rock that surrounds it
5. (Pathology) pathol another word for calculus
conˈcretionary adj

con•cre•tion

(kɒnˈkri ʃən, kɒŋ-)

n.
1. the act or process of concreting or becoming substantial; coalescence; solidification.
2. the state of being concreted.
3. a solid mass formed by or as if by coalescence or cohesion: a concretion of melted candies.
4. anything that is made real, tangible, or particular.
5. a solid or calcified mass in the body formed by a disease process.
6. a rounded mass of mineral matter occurring in sandstone, clay, etc., often in concentric layers about a nucleus.
[1535–45; < Latin]
con•cre′tion•ar′y, adj.

Concretion

 a lump, nodule, or clot; a cohesion of particles.
Examples: concretion of ceremonial matters, 1634; of marine shells, 1796; of salt, 1697; of slime, 1626.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.concretion - the formation of stonelike objects within a body organ (e.g., the kidneys)
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
2.concretion - a hard lump produced by the concretion of mineral salts; found in hollow organs or ducts of the body; "renal calculi can be very painful"
bladder stone, cystolith - a calculus formed in the bladder
enterolith - a calculus occurring in the intestines
bilestone, gallstone - a calculus formed in the gall bladder or its ducts
kidney stone, nephrolith, renal calculus, urinary calculus - a calculus formed in the kidney
ptyalith - calculus in a salivary gland
rock, stone - a lump or mass of hard consolidated mineral matter; "he threw a rock at me"
salivary calculus, sialolith - a stone formed in the salivary gland
urolith - a urinary stone
3.concretion - an increase in the density of somethingconcretion - an increase in the density of something
concentration - increase in density
4.concretion - the union of diverse things into one body or form or group; the growing together of parts
jointure, uniting, unification, conjugation, union - the act of making or becoming a single unit; "the union of opposing factions"; "he looked forward to the unification of his family for the holidays"
Translations

concretion

[kənˈkriːʃən] Nconcreción f

concretion

n (= coalescence)Verschmelzung f; (Geol also) → Konkretion f; (Med) → Konkrement nt

con·cre·tion

n. concreción, bezoar o masa inorgánica que se acumula en partes del cuerpo.
References in classic literature ?
There, in three or four fathoms of water, between the reefs of Pacou and Vanou, lay anchors, cannons, pigs of lead and iron, embedded in the limy concretions. The large boat and the whaler belonging to the Astrolabe were sent to this place, and, not without some difficulty, their crews hauled up an anchor weighing 1,800 lbs., a brass gun, some pigs of iron, and two copper swivel-guns.
Troubles and other realities took on themselves a meta-physical impalpability, sinking to mere mental phenomena for serene contemplation, and no longer stood as pressing concretions which chafed body and soul.
We here see at the bottom of the cliffs, beds containing sharks' teeth and sea-shells of extinct species, passing above into an indurated marl, and from that into the red clayey earth of the Pampas, with its calcareous concretions and the bones of terrestrial quadrupeds.
Some concretions constantly are sprayed with water to preserve the artifacts within; others rest inside water tanks.
A walkway to the Gallery of Gems and Gold is lined with some of the ROM's largest and most impressive mineral specimens, among them a sandstone formation known colloquially as a gogotte--a bizarre natural structure formed from concretions in 30-million-year-old sands left by an ancient river system in France.
Associations can also be superficial because the roughness and nature of the shell allows the formation of resistant deposits of hard biogenic concretions (Fig.
Rhinoliths are rare calcareous concretions that form as the result of a deposition of salts on an intranasal foreign body.
These layers thicken over time, forming dense, concrete-like shells called "concretions." Concretions are a mixed blessing for maritime archeologists: Although they can help preserve the artifacts they encase, they also conceal their contents.
will follow the experts as they X-ray the mysterious concretions brought up from the seabed, which could contain anything from human bones to gold dust.
Bezoars are concretions of foreign materials in the stomach, small intestine or bowel of people or animals that impair gastrointestinal motility or cause intestinal obstruction.
Some diverticulae were noted to contain concretions, presumably faecoliths.