conductus


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conductus

(kənˈdʌktəs)
n
a style of medieval liturgical composition for up to four voices; these were composed in the 12th and 13th centuries
References in periodicals archive ?
Superconductor Technologies earlier announced that the Institute for Plasma Research, India, or "IPR," has selected STI's Conductus wire for use in IPR's next generation Tokamak fusion development.
The "broken voices" could already have referred to the motet, yet they might also have related to the conductus, vocal compositions for one or more voices, which, however, have only been documented in records dating from the late-14th and the early-15th centuries.
Jahrhundert stammenden Codex B 56 De fisulis organicis uber die Mensurierung der Orgelpfeifen sowie wegen des Codex 102 im Kloster Engelberg, der eine der altesten Fassungen des Conductus Audi chorum organicum uberliefert.
John Stevens [Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004]; Notre Dame and Related Conductus: Opera Omnia, ed.
(STI) has provided an update on the status of its Conductus superconducting wire manufacturing assembly process.
Superconductor Technologies Inc, a world leader in the development and production of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials and associated technologies, over the last few months has shipped hundreds of metres of Conductus wire to nine customers.
In consideration for the use of the patent, STI will receive cost savings on support equipment for its Conductus HTS wire program.
The processional pieces, or conductus, which mark the entrance of important personages, produce an effect of stateliness, and provide effective comment upon the turns in the action.
Essays include discussion of new editing methods for transcribing the polyphonic Notre Dame conductus repertoire; John Bull's "Art of Canon" and plainsong-based counterpoint in the late Renaissance; the cognitive processes involved in music, drawing on Jung's eight cognitive processes; the sinfonias of Bach; basic formal structures in music; Wolf's "An eine Aolsharfe"; the teleological aspects of nontonal music; and satire in twentieth-century music by Mahler, Shostakovich, and Lebic.