metalanguage

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met·a·lan·guage

 (mĕt′ə-lăng′gwĭj)
n.
1. A language or vocabulary used to describe or analyze language.
2. Computers A language used to define another language.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

metalanguage

(ˈmɛtəˌlæŋɡwɪdʒ)
n
(Linguistics) a language or system of symbols used to discuss another language or system. See also formal language, natural language Compare object language
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

met•a•lan•guage

(ˈmɛt əˌlæŋ gwɪdʒ)

n.
a language or symbolic system used to discuss, describe, or analyze another language or symbolic system.
[1935–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metalanguage - a language that can be used to describe languagesmetalanguage - a language that can be used to describe languages
language, linguistic communication - a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols; "he taught foreign languages"; "the language introduced is standard throughout the text"; "the speed with which a program can be executed depends on the language in which it is written"
syntax language - a language used to describe the syntax of another language
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
metajazyk
metakieli
hjálparmállýsimál
メタ言語
metajazyk

metalanguage

[ˈmetəˌlæŋgwɪdʒ] Nmetalenguaje m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

metalanguage

nMetasprache f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
The 'conduit metaphor' revisited: A reassessment of metaphors for communication.
The conduit metaphor serves as a perfect example of a fused metaphor.
Talk about terrorism and the media: Communicating with the conduit metaphor. Communication, Culture & Critique, 1, 378-395.
In our view, the verb say (defined as "to express with words") (20) is the verb of communication that genuinely conveys the implications of Reddy's Conduit Metaphor (1979).
Reddy (1993) showed that much of the language that we use to talk about language is based on the CONDUIT metaphor. We conceptualize ideas, concepts, thoughts, meaning, feelings and sense as objects; words and sentences as containers; and communication as an act of sending and receiving these containers through a conduit (Try to get your thoughts across better.
Findings reveal that the practitioners and academics relied on similar metaphors (including the Conduit Metaphor), metonymies, and constructed scenarios.
Freeman, "Othello and the 'Ocular Proof'" (56-71); Mark Turner, "The Ghost of Anyone's Father" (72-97); Graham Bradshaw, "Precious Nonsense and the CONDUIT Metaphor" (98-122); Per Aage Brandt, "Metaphors and Meaning in Shakespeare's Sonnet 73" (123-34).
In particular, I would like to ask if the information and communication model popularly known as the "conduit metaphor," which is still the dominant theoretical model in communication studies and in library and information studies, adequately models the different levels of community or organization that make up our macro-social selves and our more micropersonal selves.
Reddy (1979) labeled this understanding of literacy and communication as the conduit metaphor where feelings, thoughts, and understanding are transferred from one person to another through the conduits of individual communicative activity that rely on linguistic competence.
Looking at the very first sense of style in the OED immediately reminded me of a story, which on investigation turned out to be a missing piece of the Conduit Metaphor, pointing to the symbolic nature of writing.