Coniston Water


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Coniston Water

(ˈkɒnɪstən)
n
(Placename) a lake in NW England, in Cumbria: scene of the establishment of world water speed records by Sir Malcolm Campbell (1939) and his son Donald Campbell (1959). Length: 8 km (5 miles)
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The "Avonvale Avengers" will climb the 2,600ft-high Old Man of Coniston, bike a 12-mile route in Grizedale Forest, and canoe a designated course on Coniston water.
It killed Campbell instantly as he tried to beat his own world record on Coniston Water in January 1967.
Also on This Day: 1785: Birth of German fairytale writer Jacob Grimm; 1809: Birth of Frenchman Louis Braille, inventor of the language for the blind; 1884: The socialist Fabian Society was founded in London; 1936: The first pop music chart was compiled by the American magazine Billboard ; 1965: Death of the American-born poet TS Eliot; 1972: Rose Heilbron became the first woman judge in Britain at the Old Bailey; 1967: Donald Campbell was killed attempting a new water speed record on Coniston Water in the Lake District.
PAUL BYRNE IT is more than 40 years since Donald Campbell died in a crash on Coniston Water trying to set a new world speed record.
Drive on for half an hour and you'll reach the Amazon, flowing into Coniston Water.
Built to enjoy the surrounding countryside and exceptional fell and mountain views, the hotel is a short walk from Coniston Water where Donald Campbell broke the world speed record in 1955 and later died making another attempt.
Carol Park, 30, vanished from her home at Leece,near Barrow in Cumbria, in 1976, and her body was found in 1997 in Coniston Water.
An unsolved missing persons case from 1976, it became a murder investigation in 1994 after the body of Carol Park was found in Coniston Water.
Campbell perished when his jet-powered boat Bluebird K7 flipped over and crashed as he tried to break his own world water-speed record on Coniston Water, in the Lake District.
Coniston Water looks set to become the temporary home this year for the Lake District annual power boat speed records week in October.
Diver Bill Smith, of Tynemouth, raised the craft 150 feet from the bed of Coniston Water in the Lake District, where Campbell died in 1967 trying to break the world water speed record.
30pm yesterday a group exploring a disused slate mine on the Old Man of Coniston above Coniston Water discovered the remains, which are believed to be that of the missing 54-year-old, who was last seen after arriving at work on Monday,July 21.