momentum

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Related to Conservation of impulse: linear momentum

mo·men·tum

 (mō-mĕn′təm)
n. pl. mo·men·ta (-tə) or mo·men·tums
1. Symbol pPhysics A quantity used to measure the motion of a body, equal to the product of the body's mass and its velocity. Also called linear momentum.
2.
a. The force or energy exhibited by a moving body: The ball did not have enough momentum to reach the goalposts.
b. The driving force or advancing strength of a development or course of events: The effort to reform public education has been gaining momentum.
3. Philosophy An essential or constituent element; a moment.

[Latin mōmentum, movement, from *movimentum, from movēre, to move; see meuə- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

momentum

(məʊˈmɛntəm)
n, pl -ta (-tə) or -tums
1. (General Physics) physics the product of a body's mass and its velocity. Symbol: p See also angular momentum
2. (General Physics) the impetus of a body resulting from its motion
3. driving power or strength
[C17: from Latin: movement; see moment]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mo•men•tum

(moʊˈmɛn təm)

n., pl. -ta (-tə), -tums.
1. force or speed of movement; impetus, as of a physical object or course of events: a career that lost momentum.
2. Mech. a quantity expressing the motion of a body or system, equal to the product of the mass of a body and its velocity.
[1690–1700; < Latin mōmentum; see moment]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mo·men·tum

(mō-mĕn′təm)
A quantity used to measure the motion of a body, equal to the product of its mass and velocity. Any change in the speed or direction of a body changes its momentum.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
moment, momentum - Latin momentum, from movere, "move," and -mentum, is the source of moment and momentum, which first meant "moving power."
See also related terms for moment.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

momentum

Mass multiplied by velocity.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.momentum - an impelling force or strengthmomentum - an impelling force or strength; "the car's momentum carried it off the road"
forcefulness, strength, force - physical energy or intensity; "he hit with all the force he could muster"; "it was destroyed by the strength of the gale"; "a government has not the vitality and forcefulness of a living man"
2.momentum - the product of a body's mass and its velocitymomentum - the product of a body's mass and its velocity; "the momentum of the particles was deduced from meteoritic velocities"
physical property - any property used to characterize matter and energy and their interactions
angular momentum - the product of the momentum of a rotating body and its distance from the axis of rotation; "any rotating body has an angular momentum about its center of mass"; "angular momentum makes the world go round"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

momentum

noun impetus, force, power, drive, push, energy, strength, thrust, propulsion, welly (slang) This campaign is really gaining momentum.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
زَخَم، قُوَّة دافِعَه
hybnost
fart
incitationquantité de mouvement
mozgásmennyiség
skriîòungi
judėjimo kiekisvaromoji jėga
kustības daudzums
hybnosť

momentum

[məʊˈmentəm] N (momentums or momenta (pl)) [məʊˈmentə] (Phys) → momento m (fig) → ímpetu m, impulso m
to gather or gain momentum (lit) → cobrar velocidad (fig) → ganar fuerza
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

momentum

[məʊˈmɛntəm] n
[process, movement] → impulsion f, élan m
to gather momentum [process, movement] → s'accélérer
(PHYSICS)quantité f de mouvement
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

momentum

n (of moving object)Schwung m; (at moment of impact) → Wucht f; (Phys) → Impuls m; (fig)Schwung m; the rock’s momentum carried it through the wallder Felsbrocken hatte eine solche Wucht, dass er die Mauer durchschlug; he let the car go under its own momentumer ließ das Auto von allein weiterrollen; to gather or gain momentum (lit)sich beschleunigen, in Fahrt kommen (inf); (fig, idea, movement, plan) → in Gang kommen; the campaign is now gathering or gaining momentumdie Kampagne kommt nun in Gang or in Schwung; to keep going under its own momentum (lit)sich aus eigener Kraft weiterbewegen; (fig)eine Eigendynamik entwickelt haben; to lose momentum (lit, fig)Schwung verlieren
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

momentum

[məʊˈmɛntəm] n (Phys) → momento, quantità f inv di moto (fig) → slancio, impeto, velocità f inv acquisita
to gather or gain momentum (vehicle, person) → acquistare or prendere velocità, aumentare di velocità (fig) → prendere or guadagnare terreno
to lose momentum (vehicle, person) → perdere velocità (fig) → perdere vigore
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

momentum

(məˈmentəm) noun
the amount or force of motion in a moving body.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

mo·men·tum

n. L. momentum; ímpetu; fuerza de movimiento.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The model is based on fundamental thrust force expression, which derives from the conservation of impulse equation applied to a volume which includes the propulsion system (Carafoli & Constantinescu, 1984).

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