consilience


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con·sil·i·ence

 (kən-sĭl′ē-əns)
n.
The agreement of two or more inductions drawn from different sets of data; concurrence.

[Probably coined by William Whewell (1794-1866), British scientist and philosopher, as if from New Latin *cōnsilīre, to leap together (Latin com-, com- + Latin -silīre, combining form of salīre, to leap, as in resilīre, to leap back; see resile) + -ence.]

con·sil′i·ent adj.

consilience

(kənˈsɪlɪəns)
n
agreement between inductions drawn from different sets of data or from different academic disciplines

consilience

a chance happening or coincidence. See also agreement.
See also: Chance
the process of concurring or agreeing. See also chance.
See also: Agreement
References in periodicals archive ?
It was a rare case of consilience across disciplines, says Blasi.
Nature Speaks -- Consilience, Concinnity and the Way: 7 p.m.
In Islamabad he has been exhibiting his work but got prominence from a two-artist exhibition titled Inimitable Consilience with Tassaduq Suhail in 2015 in which both painters painted on each other's canvases creating history in Pakistani art.
So when they see an advertisement for The Positron Project in the town of Consilience -- a social experiment offering stable jobs and a home of their own -- they sign up immediately.
Wilson's book Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge, published in 1998.
Wilson's Consilience reflects Neuman's understanding of the distinction between "critical" and "administrative" approaches as expressing the "two cultures" divide between the sciences and humanities.
O., Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge, New York: Vintage, 1999.
According to one scholar, by adopting the scientific method in a spirit of consilience, we can gather "much more reliable knowledge" and our discipline can finally be one where "real understanding accumulates" (Carroll 13).
Mumbai based innovations and education consultancy, Consilience, will design and build the courses offered on the Brightspace learning platform.
CONSILIENCE A Taken with something else B Comprehensive view C Concurrence who am I?
(27) Such a "consilience" of interdisciplinary approaches can shed new light and bring new perspectives to an area of law that "may be particularly representative of intellectual inertia." (28)