consolidation

(redirected from Consolidated Accounts)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

con·sol·i·da·tion

 (kən-sŏl′ĭ-dā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of consolidating.
b. The state of being consolidated.
2. The merger of two or more commercial interests or corporations.

consolidation

(kənˌsɒlɪˈdeɪʃən)
n
1. the act of consolidating or state of being consolidated
2. something that is consolidated or integrated
3. (Law) law
a. the combining of two or more actions at law
b. the combination of a number of Acts of Parliament into one codifying statute
4. (Geological Science) geology the process, including compression and cementation, by which a loose deposit is transformed into a hard rock
5. (Psychology) psychol the process in the brain that makes the memory for an event enduring; the process is thought to continue for some time after the event
conˈsoliˌdative adj

con•sol•i•da•tion

(kənˌsɒl ɪˈdeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an act or instance of consolidating; the state of being consolidated; unification.
2. solidification; strengthening.
3. something that is or has been consolidated; a consolidated whole.
4. a statutory combination of two or more corporations.
5. the process of becoming solid, as the changing of lung tissue from aerated and elastic to firm in certain diseases.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Late Latin]
con•sol′i•da`tive, adj.

consolidation

The combining or merging of elements to perform a common or related function.

Consolidation

 combination of two or more Acts, Bills, or Statutes to be placed before Parliament; a combining of two or more sources of income, the union of two benefices or offices of State—Wilkes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.consolidation - combining into a solid mass
combining, combine - an occurrence that results in things being united
2.consolidation - the act of combining into an integral whole; "a consolidation of two corporations"; "after their consolidation the two bills were passed unanimously"; "the defendants asked for a consolidation of the actions against them"
compounding, combining, combination - the act of combining things to form a new whole
centralisation, centralization - the act of consolidating power under a central control
incorporation - consolidating two or more things; union in (or into) one body
amalgamation, merger, uniting - the combination of two or more commercial companies
vertical combination, vertical integration - absorption into a single firm of several firms involved in all aspects of a product's manufacture from raw materials to distribution
horizontal combination, horizontal integration - absorption into a single firm of several firms involved in the same level of production and sharing resources at that level
3.consolidation - something that has consolidated into a compact mass; "he dropped the consolidation into the acid bath"
natural object - an object occurring naturally; not made by man

consolidation

noun
1. strengthening, reinforcement, fortification, stabilization Change brought about the growth and consolidation of the working class.
2. combination, union, association, alliance, merger, federation, amalgamation Further consolidations in the industry may follow.

consolidation

noun
A bringing together into a whole:
Translations
تَوطيد، تَدْعيم، تَعْزيز
upevněníztuhnutí
konsolideringstyrkelse
megszilárdítás
styrking, efling
sağlamlaştırma

consolidation

[kənˌsɒlɪˈdeɪʃən] N
1. (= strengthening) → consolidación f
2. (= combining) → concentración f, fusión f

consolidation

[kənˌsɒlɪˈdeɪʃən] n
[power, position] → consolidation f
(= amalgamation) [groups, firms] → fusion f

consolidation

n
(= strengthening)Festigung f
(= amalgamation)Zusammenlegung f, → Vereinigung f; (of companies)Zusammenschluss m; (of funds, debts)Konsolidierung f

consolidation

[kənˌsɒlɪˈdeɪʃn] n (see vb) → consolidazione f, fusione f, unione f

consolidate

(kənˈsolideit) verb
to make or become solid; to strengthen.
conˌsoliˈdation noun

consolidation

n consolidación f
References in periodicals archive ?
We should sit down and begin to separate the federation and consolidated accounts.
26 per share in consolidated accounts compared to its FY16 EPS of Re 0.
The Government published today (December 14) its accrual-based consolidated accounts for the financial year 2016-17.
Improved collections also resulted in a 6 percent decline in consolidated accounts receivables, the company said.
Thus, the consolidated accounts include: Required documents--consolidated balance sheet, consolidated income statement, consolidated addendum, the management report of the group, and the recommended documents to be published--the consolidated financing panel, the treasury variation panel, the equity variation panel, the auditor's report.
Albion shareholders have only received consolidated accounts so far - - which offer little information about the football club's financial status.
At the very least, Option Initiatives Audit' suggests re-organising co-audits so that subsidiaries would be audited by different auditors to those dealing with the consolidated accounts of the group.
18 -- The Mutual Fund Industry has implemented issuance of Consolidated Accounts Statement (CAS) to its investors.
7 per cent reduction were contained in the Scottish Government Consolidated Accounts 2010-11 report.
Deloitte & Touche said that it had warned the airline after auditing the privately owned Volare Group's consolidated accounts in 2002 and 2003 and that the airline was in financial trouble and that its recovery depended on finding new finance to implement the board's strategy.
A centerpiece will be the Eighth Company Law Directive that will clarify the duties of statutory auditors, their independence and ethics, and introduce the full responsibility of the group auditor for the audit of consolidated accounts of groups of companies.
Although the Government has decided to give unlisted companies the option of whether to use these standards in their annual and consolidated accounts from 2005, it does not mean smaller firms can afford to ignore IAS, according to the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW).

Full browser ?