dissonant

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dis·so·nant

 (dĭs′ə-nənt)
adj.
1. Harsh and inharmonious in sound; discordant.
2. Being at variance; disagreeing.
3. Music Constituting or producing a dissonance.

[Middle English dissonaunt, from Old French dissonant, from Latin dissonāns, dissonant-, present participle of dissonāre, to be dissonant : dis-, apart; see dis- + sonāre, to sound; see swen- in Indo-European roots.]

dis′so·nant·ly adv.

dissonant

(ˈdɪsənənt)
adj
1. discordant; cacophonous
2. incongruous or discrepant
3. (Music, other) music characterized by dissonance
[C15: from Latin dissonāre to be discordant, from dis-1 + sonāre to sound]
ˈdissonantly adv

dis•so•nant

(ˈdɪs ə nənt)

adj.
1. disagreeing or harsh in sound; discordant.
2. disagreeing or incongruous; at variance.
3. harmonically unresolved.
[1400–50; late Middle English dissonaunte (< Anglo-French) < Latin dissonant-, s. of dissonāns, present participle of dissonāre to sound harsh]
dis′so•nant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dissonant - characterized by musical dissonance; harmonically unresolved
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
inharmonious, unharmonious - not in harmony
2.dissonant - lacking in harmony
inharmonious, unharmonious - not in harmony
3.dissonant - not in accord; "desires at variance with his duty"; "widely discrepant statements"
discordant - not in agreement or harmony; "views discordant with present-day ideas"

dissonant

adjective
1. disagreeing, differing, at variance, dissentient All but a few dissonant voices agree.
2. discordant, harsh, jarring, grating, raucous, strident, jangling, out of tune, tuneless, cacophonous, inharmonious, unmelodious Guitarists kept strumming wildly dissonant chords.

dissonant

adjective
1. Characterized by unpleasant discordance of sound:
2. Made up of parts or qualities that are disparate or otherwise markedly lacking in consistency:
Translations

dissonant

[ˈdɪsənənt] ADJdisonante

dissonant

[ˈdɪsənənt] adj
(MUSIC) [chord, harmony] → dissonant(e)
(= clashing) [voices, images] → discordant(e)

dissonant

adj (Mus) → dissonant; (fig) opinions, temperamentsunvereinbar; coloursdisharmonisch
References in periodicals archive ?
Stevens uses a fair amount of octatonic and occasional whole tone scales/harmonies, with surprising horizontal and vertical combinations of half-steps and fourths, creating an interesting balance of consonance and dissonance.
An example of this melding of theory and psychology is Ball's explanation of consonance and dissonance, starting on page 165.
A theory much discussed by Wardhaugh is the so-called 'coincidence theory', designed to provide a mechanical explanation for consonance and dissonance, superseding the ancient conception that saw causes in the numbers themselves.
The harmonic environment of Hennessy's songs contains a balance of consonance and dissonance in service to the meaning of the text.
Traditional consonance and dissonance in species counterpoint can be summarized as in Example 1.