Constantine I


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Related to Constantine I: Malcolm III, Constantius II

Con·stan·tine I 1

 (kŏn′stən-tēn′, -tīn′) Known as "Constantine the Great." Originally Flavius Valerius Constantinus. ad 285?-337.
Emperor of Rome (306-337) who adopted the Christian faith and suspended the persecution of Christians. He rebuilt Constantinople (now Istanbul) as the new Rome (330).

Con·stan·tine I 2

 (kŏn′stən-tēn, -tīn′) 1868-1923.
King of Greece (1913-1917) who opposed the Allies in World War I and was forced to abdicate. He returned to the throne in 1920 but abdicated again (1922) after a military rebellion.

Constantine I

(ˈkɒnstənˌtaɪn; -ˌtiːn)
n
1. (Biography) known as Constantine the Great. Latin name Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus. ?280–337 ad, first Christian Roman emperor (306–337): moved his capital to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (330)
2. (Biography) 1868–1923, king of Greece (1913–17; 1920–22): deposed (1917), recalled by a plebiscite (1920), but forced to abdicate again (1922) after defeat by the Turks
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Noun1.Constantine I - Emperor of Rome who stopped the persecution of Christians and in 324 made Christianity the official religion of the Roman EmpireConstantine I - Emperor of Rome who stopped the persecution of Christians and in 324 made Christianity the official religion of the Roman Empire; in 330 he moved his capital from Rome to Byzantium and renamed it Constantinople (280-337)
References in periodicals archive ?
1917 - Alexander I becomes King of Greece following his father Constantine I's abdication.
Precise definitions of, e.g., a liburna, a mainstay of Roman fleets, or Constantine I's triaconters [AD 324], which sounded the trireme's death knell, float in the air.
(4) In the first five centuries of Christianity in the Roman Empire there was a movement from one gestalt--"Early Christianity"--to a second gestalt that took several centuries to take shape, and that many people, including Leithart in the last word of his book title, call "Christendom." Did this gestalt-shift indeed take place, and, if so, how was the shift related to the emperor Constantine i?
The brothers and nephews of Constantine I are likewise treated as if they had never existed (but see Or.
A competent and energetic emperor, the third-century Roman recovery was possible in large part because of the respite won by his victories; some of his favorable reputation may be due to Constantine I's claim that Claudius was an ancestor.
It is an indisputable fact that Constantine I died near Nicomedia in Bithynia on 22 May 337.(1) However, considerable uncertainty remains as to the exact location of his death in or near Nicomedia, and this impacts also on our understanding of his activities and intentions at that time.
Constantine is a mineral exploration company led by an experienced and proven technical team with a focus on premier North American mining environments.
Constantine is a mineral exploration company led by an experienced and proven technical team with a ‎focus on premier North American mining environments.
Constantine is currently authorized under the BLM for up to 40 acres of ground disturbance to carry out exploratory activity on their Federal claims.
John Constantine is a true Scouse anti-hero, a working class wizard, occult detective and professional sorcerer.
Like all good demon fighters, Ryan's Constantine is plagued by a dark past, haunted by the 9-year-old girl he couldn't save, sentencing his own soul to hell.
Constantine is survived by his son, Kyle Constantine of Clinton; and his siblings, Hazel Dixon of Danville, Va., Nancy Courtemanche of Marlboro, Donald Supernault of Danville, Va., Harry Constantine of Sterling and Richard Constantine of Hudson.