Constitution of the United States

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Noun1.Constitution of the United States - the constitution written at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787 and subsequently ratified by the original thirteen statesConstitution of the United States - the constitution written at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787 and subsequently ratified by the original thirteen states
advice and consent - a legal expression in the United States Constitution that allows the Senate to constrain the President's powers of appointment and treaty-making
Bill of Rights - a statement of fundamental rights and privileges (especially the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution)
Fourteenth Amendment - an amendment to the Constitution of the United States adopted in 1868; extends the guarantees of the Bill of Rights to the states as well as to the federal government
Eighteenth Amendment - an amendment to the Constitution of the United States adopted in 1920; prohibited the manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages; repealed in 1932
Nineteenth Amendment - an amendment to the Constitution of the United States adopted in 1920; guarantees that no state can deny the right to vote on the basis of sex
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Constitutional Convention of 1787: A Reference Guide
At the close of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, Benjamin Franklin was asked, "Well, Doctor, what have we got -- a republic or a monarchy?" Franklin replied, "A republic, if you can keep it."
It's no wonder that these state constitutions were so influential on the federal constitution, as many of the delegates to the Constitutional Convention of 1787 took leading roles in the writing of their state constitutions.
His topic was the debate over James Madison's proposal to empower the federal government to veto any law passed by one of the several states (the "federal negative") during the Constitutional Convention of 1787. Hill and Bedke, who attended the presentation, were impressed by Moss' insights.
Federal Constitutional Convention of 1787 As A Source of the Original
dissertation, "The South Carolina Delegates to the Constitutional Convention of 1787: An Analytical Study" completed at Duke University in 1956, Shirley Sidney Ulmer wrote: "The degree to which Pinckney's religious tolerance deviated from the climate of opinion in South Carolina may be derived from the knowledge of certain provisions in the state constitution at that time.
There were invocations of another convention: the Constitutional Convention of 1787, held, reportedly, during another sweltering Philadelphia summer.
They describe the forces that led to the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and the decision of the delegates to jettison the dysfunctional Articles of Confederation and replace them with a document that would weld the thirteen separate states into one nation ruled by a strong central government.
For instance, his model is not the grandiose Constitutional Convention of 1787, but the more legislatively defined and achievable Pendleton Civil Service Act of 1883.
Finkelman begins with the Constitutional Convention of 1787. He agrees with abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, who denounced the Constitution as a "covenant with death" and "an agreement with Hell" for its tolerance of slavery.
The Electoral College was a key part of the compromise between large and small states at the Constitutional Convention of 1787, and it has served America well for more than 200 years.
Gutzman's day-by-day analysis of the debates and actions of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 is long--80 pages--but superb.

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