constitutional monarchy

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Related to Constitutional monarchies: parliamentary monarchy

constitutional monarchy

n.
A monarchy in which the powers of the ruler are restricted to those granted under the constitution and laws of the nation.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

constitutional monarchy

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a monarchy governed according to a constitution that limits and defines the powers of the sovereign. Also called: limited monarchy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

constitutional monarchy

a system in which the powers of a monarch are defined and limited by law.
See also: Government
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
konstitutionelle Monarchie

constitutional monarchy

nmonarchia costituzionale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Whatever the situation, opportunites to strengthen the constitutional monarchies should not be missed, nor opportunities to advance authoritarian monarchies to constitutional ones.
Monarchies, on the other hand, have the additional option of a transition to constitutional monarchies in which they fade away in terms of the exercise of power while maintaining considerable prestige, popularity, and relevance.2 In the turmoil of the times, the King of Morocco, Muhammad VI, and King Hamad of Bahrain have both responded to protests by promising a transition to constitutional monarchy.3 Muhammad VI has done this by announcing plans for comprehensive constitutional changes to implement the transition.
Let's assume that the most optimistic scenario is realized--that within free years most Middle Eastern states will be either constitutional monarchies or full-fledged democracies.
They are all modern constitutional monarchies in countries where the majority of the people of those nations have absolutely no intention of removing their monarchy because of the benefits they recognise they derive from it.
Under the constitutional monarchies of 1815-1848, when leadership, as under Napoleon I, fell to a combination of aristocratic and middle-class "notables," theater women were represented as "magdalenes": sinners who could be redeemed through love and the embracing of domestic virtues.
Such a constitution may be `written' and codified, as indeed it is in the vast majority of the constitutional monarchies of the modern world.
Today by contrast, although the majority of states in Europe are republics, all of the monarchies which have survived are without doubt constitutional monarchies. Seven European states apart from Britain are monarchies--the three Scandinavian countries, the Low Countries and Spain, where it was restored in 1975 after the death of Franco.
Britain is the prototype of modern constitutional monarchies for two main reasons.

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