allergen

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Related to Contact allergen: contact dermatitis, Allergic contact dermatitis

allergen

any substance that induces an allergy, such as pollen, grasses, certain foods, and medications
Not to be confused with:
allergic – pertaining to an allergy: allergic to peanuts
allergy – an abnormal reaction of the body to an allergen, manifested by runny nose, skin rash, wheezing, etc.; hypersensitivity to the reintroduction of an allergen
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

al·ler·gen

 (ăl′ər-jən)
n.
A substance, such as pollen, that causes an allergy.

[German Allergen : Aller(gie), allergy; see allergy + -gen, -gen (from French -gène; see -gen).]

al′ler·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

allergen

(ˈæləˌdʒɛn) or

allergin

n
(Biology) any substance capable of inducing an allergy
ˌallerˈgenic adj
ˌallergeˈnicity n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

al•ler•gen

(ˈæl ər dʒən, -ˌdʒɛn)

n.
any substance, usu. a protein, that induces an allergic reaction in a particular individual.
[1910–15; aller(gy) + -gen]
al`ler•gen′ic (-ˈdʒɛn ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

al·ler·gen

(ăl′ər-jən)
A substance, such as pollen, that causes an allergy.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

allergen

- Though allergens are not harmful themselves, when they are combined with certain antibodies, a reaction (i.e. the allergy) liberates substances that damage body cells and tissues.
See also related terms for harmful.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.allergen - any substance that can cause an allergyallergen - any substance that can cause an allergy
substance - a particular kind or species of matter with uniform properties; "shigella is one of the most toxic substances known to man"
ragweed pollen - pollen of the ragweed plant is a common allergen
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
alergen
allergen

allergen

[ˈælədʒən] Nalérgeno m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

allergen

[ˈælərɛn] nallergène m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

allergen

n (Med) → Allergen nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

al·ler·gen

n. alérgeno, antígeno que induce una respuesta alérgica o hipersensitiva.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

allergen

n alérgeno or alergeno
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other countries can contact Allergen in their country with this (https://c212.net/c/link/?t=0&l=en&o=2533029-1&h=2843386311&u=https%3A%2F%2Fnam04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com%2F%3Furl%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Fallergan-web-cdn-prod.azureedge.net%252Factavis%252Factavis%252Fmedia%252Fallergan-pdf-documents%252Fmedical-information-contact-list.pdf%26data%3D01%257C01%257CLisa.Brown%2540allergan.com%257C019259a6ab9549d4e0f908d70fe5048f%257C4b79823aaef849faa34cb4ba59e8afd9%257C0%26sdata%3Dm2ogN7ukZT60eungx5dwEcqPEQ8S6uKBD%252BkRscwwzNk%253D%26reserved%3D0&a=Allergan+Global+Medical+Information+Contacts) link.
WASHINGTON -- The American Contact Dermatitis Society has selected isobornyl acrylate the contact allergen of the year.
The ubiquitous contact allergen. In: Fishers Contact Dermatitis.
A lot of people are not aware that it can act as a contact allergen as it auto-oxidizes on exposure to air.
This mixture of PPD is a known contact allergen and can evoke Type IV delayed hypersensitivity reaction based on its concentration and duration of exposure.
In 1 case, propranolol was the only contact allergen identified [2].
Recently, researchers writing a letter to the editor in the Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology said they analyzed 187 personal-care products for kids (shampoos, sunscreens, diaper creams, etc.) all labeled "hypoallergenic,'' "dermatologist recommended,'' "fragrance-free'' or "paraben-free.'' What they found was that 89 percent contained at least one chemical known to cause contact dermatitis and 11 percent contained five or more contact allergens. Methylisothiazolinone, named "Contact Allergen of the Year'' in 2013 by the American Contact Dermatitis Society, showed up in 21 of the 187 supposedly kind-to-skin products.
Benzophenones, chemical ultraviolet light absorbers used in products ranging from sunscreens and hair sprays to plastic lens filters for color photography, have been named the American Contact Dermatitis Society's 2014 Contact Allergen of the Year.
Methylisothiazolinone has been deemed to be such an important emerging allergen that it was named "Contact Allergen of the Year" for 2013 by the American Contact Dermatitis Society [2].
From the 70 patients in the study group, 48 (68.57%) had positive skin tests, with identification of contact allergen involved in the development and exacerbation of skin lesions: 28 patients in subgroup 1 (chronic venous disease) (70%) and 20 patients in subgroup 2 (atopic dermatitis) (66.67%).
On some occasions a thorough history, physical examination, and skin testing or patch testing results in the identification of a drug, food, aeroallergen, contact allergen, or environmental exposure that accounts for the cutaneous symptoms.
The American Contact Dermatitis Society has a database known as the Contact Allergen Replacement Database (CARD) that contains updated information on more than 2000 topical skin care products and their ingredients.