contact print

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contact print

n.
A print made by exposing a photosensitive surface in direct contact with a photographic negative.

contact print

n
(Photography) a photographic print made by exposing the printing paper through a negative placed directly onto it

con′tact print`


n.
a photographic print made by placing a negative directly in contact with sensitized paper, with their emulsion surfaces facing, and exposing them to light. Compare projection print.

contact print

A print made from a negative or a diapositive in direct contact with sensitized material.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.contact print - a print made by exposing a photosensitive surface to direct contact with a photographic negative
print - a picture or design printed from an engraving
References in periodicals archive ?
With an industry best cost-of-ownership and superior gray level imaging (GLI) technology, Maskless' award-winning, digital imaging technology is fast becoming the digital lithography of choice for the PCB industry as it moves away from contact printing, at 50-micron feature sizes.
In general, nanocomposite solutions are used for thin ink-jet printing, and pastes are used for thick screen and contact printing.
Most uncured extrusions are still marked with a 24" (circumference) contact printing wheel that applies pigmented ink.
Beginners can create simple yet striking photographic images and learn about light-sensitive emulsion, contact printing, positive and negative images, fixing and washing prints and more.
TIP 0306-16 Guideline for direct contact printing of bar code symbols on corrugated
The article also discusses terms such as downstop, contact printing and snap-off printing and processes such as stencil design and 2-D inspection.
Without requiring expensive or unusual equipment, the Photoshop-based system is described with detail in "Making Digital Negatives for Contact Printing," Second Edition, by Dan Burkholder, 352 pages, $34.
It is interesting, then, to consider what we here at Ink World hear when we contact printing segments for our Downstream features.
He began to make copies of drawings by contact printing in about 1822, and four years later produced the first photograph from nature on a bitumen covered plate.
The first coders were purchased for brand new lines and then, following their success, were gradually introduced on to existing lines to replace non digital technologies, like hot-foil or Touch Dry contact printing.