contentless


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contentless

(ˈkɒntɛntlɪs)
adj
having no content or meaning
References in periodicals archive ?
Peace (Friede)" had become a contentless slogan among DDR officialdom, as exemplified by the nicknaming of East Berlin as the "City of Peace" and party boss Honecker's absurd defense of compulsory military training: "Military service is peace service.
We can reserve "awareness" for the contentless subjectivity complementing higher primates' underlying intentionality.
Contentless crosschecking enables a tester to review the definiteness of info in the cloud using a linear combo of all the blocks via a claiming and feedback pact, without having to down load the entire sum of info by the auditor.
Ltd China" with zero bacterial count and moisture contentless than 15%.
By taking the spatial image of passing as its central theme, metaphor and discursive modus operandi, Larsen's Passing engages with and troubles such racial and gender binary paradigms and reveals as fraudulent and contentless the stereotypes on which they are predicated.
The point is to promote a happiness that we can acknowledge as an appropriate end for the kinds of beings we are, and although that may be open to a wide range of possibilities (and endless disagreement), it is not contentless.
Because meaningfulness is built solely on an emotion, it is contentless and irreducible.
space that in so many Hardy poems is literally contentless, or blank.
This philosophy brings in the concept of Atman, or pure consciousness, which is self-manifesting and self-illuminating, contentless, formless, non intentional, not limited by time and space, both subject and object, undifferentiated, knowledge itself, and "rests in no other" (p.
As part of the same process, agency is reduced to a contentless "political will" to be exercised by recognized "political leaders" who, it is hoped, will-eventirally be forced to respond to decontextualized yet mysteriously potent -nonpolitical" information about molecule flows, machines and the risk of flooded cities provided by scientists and technologists.
He states that "the Saidian critical position implies, I shall argue, not a contentless cosmopolitanism but a secularism imbued with the experience of minority--a secularism for which minority is not simply the name of a crisis.