conditional

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con·di·tion·al

(kən-dĭsh′ə-nəl)
adj.
1. Imposing, depending on, or containing a condition. See Synonyms at dependent.
2. Grammar Stating, containing, or implying a condition.
3. Psychology Brought about by conditioning.
n. Grammar
A mood, tense, clause, word, or morpheme expressing a condition. See Usage Note at if.

con·di′tion·al′i·ty (-dĭsh′ə-năl′ĭ-tē) n.
con·di′tion·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

conditional

(kənˈdɪʃənəl)
adj
1. depending on other factors; not certain
2. (Grammar) grammar (of a clause, conjunction, form of a verb, or whole sentence) expressing a condition on which something else is contingent: "If he comes" is a conditional clause in the sentence "If he comes I shall go"
3. (Mathematics)
a. (of an equation or inequality) true for only certain values of the variable: x2 –1 = x + 1 is a conditional equation, only true for x = 2 or –1
b. (of an infinite series) divergent when the absolute values of the terms are considered
4. (Logic) logic Also: hypothetical (of a proposition) consisting of two component propositions associated by the words if…then so that the proposition is false only when the antecedent is true and the consequent false. Usually written: pq or pq, where p is the antecedent, q the consequent, and → or ⊃ symbolizes implies
n
5. (Grammar) grammar
a. a conditional form of a verb
b. a conditional clause or sentence
6. (Logic) logic a conditional proposition
conˌditionˈality n
conˈditionally adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•di•tion•al

(kənˈdɪʃ ə nl)

adj.
1. imposing, containing, subject to, or depending on a condition; not absolute: conditional acceptance.
2. (of a sentence, clause, mood, or word) involving or expressing a condition, as the first clause in the sentence If it rains, we won't go.
n.
3.
a. (in some languages) a mood, tense, or other category used in expressing conditions, often corresponding to an English verb phrase beginning with would, as Spanish comería “he (or she) would eat.”
b. a sentence, clause, or word expressing a condition.
4. Logic. a proposition expressing implication, as “If A then B.”
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French, Middle French < Late Latin]
con•di`tion•al′i•ty, n.
con•di′tion•al•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.conditional - qualified by reservations
qualified - limited or restricted; not absolute; "gave only qualified approval"
2.conditional - imposing or depending on or containing a condition; "conditional acceptance of the terms"; "lent conditional support"; "the conditional sale will not be complete until the full purchase price is paid"
qualified - limited or restricted; not absolute; "gave only qualified approval"
unconditional, unconditioned - not conditional; "unconditional surrender"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

conditional

adjective dependent, limited, qualified, subject to, contingent, provisional, with reservations Their support is conditional on their approval of his proposals. They have made us a conditional offer.
absolute, unconditional, unrestricted, categorical
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

conditional

adjective
1. Depending on or containing a condition or conditions:
2. Determined or to be determined by someone or something else:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مَشْروطمَشْرُوط
podmíněný
betinget
ehdollinenehtoehtotapakonditionaali
uvjetan
skilyrtur
条件付きの
조건부의
condicionadocondicional
podmienený
pogojen
villkorlig
ที่เป็นเงื่อนไข
koşulluşartlı
có điều kiện

conditional

[kənˈdɪʃənl]
A. ADJcondicional
conditional offeroferta f condicional
conditional tense/clausetiempo m/oración f condicional
to be conditional upondepender de
B. Ncondicional m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

conditional

[kənˈdɪʃənəl] adj [acceptance, sale, offer, contract] → conditionnel(le)
to be conditional upon sth → dépendre de qchconditional discharge (British) (LAW) ncondamnation f avec sursis
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

conditional

adj
mit Vorbehalt, bedingt, vorbehaltlich; (Comm, Jur) salemit Auflagen; a conditional yesein Ja mit Vorbehalt; to be conditional (up)on somethingvon etw abhängen
(Gram) → konditional, Konditional-, Bedingungs-; the conditional mood/tenseder Konditional
n (Gram) → Konditional m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

conditional

[kənˈdɪʃnl] adjcondizionale
to be conditional upon → dipendere da
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

condition

(kənˈdiʃən) noun
1. state or circumstances in which a person or thing is. The house is not in good condition; He is in no condition to leave hospital; under ideal conditions; living conditions; variable conditions.
2. something that must happen or be done before some other thing happens or is done; a term or requirement in an agreement. It was a condition of his going that he should pay his own expenses; That is one of the conditions in the agreement.
verb
1. to affect or control. behaviour conditioned by circumstances.
2. to put into the required state. The footballers trained hard in order to condition themselves for the match.
conˈditional adjective
depending on certain conditions. This offer of a university place is conditional on your being able to pass your final school exams; a conditional offer.
conˈditionally adverb
conˈditioner noun
something which helps in conditioning. hair-conditioner.
on condition that
if, and only if (something is done). You will be paid tomorrow on condition that the work is finished.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

conditional

مَشْرُوط podmíněný betinget vorbehaltlich εξαρτώμενος condicional ehdollinen conditionnel uvjetan condizionale 条件付きの 조건부의 voorwaardelijk avhengig warunkowy condicional обусловленный villkorlig ที่เป็นเงื่อนไข koşullu có điều kiện 有条件的
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
The nonmediated, irreducibly personal character of experience is not a contingent fact about our freedom, but the essential setting within which we make contact with eternity.
human beings are caught up in violent communal conflict, their adherence to the just war theory can render them less likely to fight in accord with the demands of justice than would otherwise be the case." He continues, writing that "this deficiency is not merely a contingent fact about the uses to which some bad actors happen to put the just war theory.
Historians have marveled at the speed with which the instrument spread from Middelburg across Europe (for which the contingent fact of the whole world's having gathered in its place of invention, the Netherlands, for a peace conference was helpful); at the speed with which Galileo rushed in to publication of his telescopic discoveries; and, finally, at the speed with which he continued his telescopic observations--not to speak of his unwillingness to share his telescopes with other astronomers--even after the publication of Sidereus Nuncius in order to monopolize all celestial discoveries yet to make.
They have convinced me that skilled migration is a great benefit to sending countries, but I do not want the Church to start teaching this contingent fact as part of Catholic social teaching.
In situating or underpinning this critique, Robinson deploys Wittgenstein correctly, quoting saliently the philosopher's assertion that 'The world is independent of my will', and emphasizing the limitations of one's power over the world with our unique self simply one contingent fact among many.
As Stephen Jay Gould argued two decades ago, human equality is a contingent fact of history.
In fact, they agree on only three things about Parfit's views on personal identity: Parfit thinks, first, that personal identity can be, in some (not merely epistemic) sense, indeterminate; second, personal identity has, as a matter of contingent fact, nothing to do with Cartesian egos; and third, personal identity has something to do with (on one version) psychological continuity or (on another version) brains and bodies and physical events and mental events.
What, after all, is the contingent fact that corresponds to the primary intension of the statement pain is the firing of C-fibers, if not that the experiential quality of painfulness is associated with (or caused by) C-fiber firing?
A wholly contingent fact is an actual fact none of whose parts are necessary.
Even if, as a matter of contingent fact, our experiences of dynamicity consisted of representations of successions of A-determinations, what would account for them being experiences of dynamicity would be solely the B-theoretic relations of succession, rather than the irrelevant A-theoretic nature of the relata.
Bourne sees this last challenge as ultimately unsuccessful yet yielding the interesting result either that time is tenseless or that tense is a contingent fact.
The prohibition against cruelty cannot be used to pass judgment on the powerful because it is a contingent fact lacking truth-value.

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