modal logic

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modal logic

n
1. (Logic) the logical study of such philosophical concepts as necessity, possibility, contingency, etc
2. (Logic) the logical study of concepts whose formal properties resemble certain moral, epistemological, and psychological concepts. See also alethic, deontic, epistemic, doxastic
3. (Logic) any formal system capable of being interpreted as a model for the behaviour of such concepts
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.modal logic - the logical study of necessity and possibility
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
2.modal logic - a system of logic whose formal properties resemble certain moral and epistemological concepts
formal logic, mathematical logic, symbolic logic - any logical system that abstracts the form of statements away from their content in order to establish abstract criteria of consistency and validity
alethic logic - the modal logic of necessity and possibility and contingency
deontic logic - the modal logic of obligation and permissibility
epistemic logic - the modal logic of knowledge and uncertainty and ignorance
doxastic logic - the modal logic of belief and disbelief
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, competitiveness is the key to contingency in that what it means to be a contingent truth is that it could have been otherwise if some other decision had been made or some other factor had gotten the upper hand.
In any case, he insisted that biography is "contingent truth" that must be "historically verifiable." Answering a question about his analysis of Mohammad Mossadegh, the prime minister who in 1953 fell afoul of Britain, the United States and the army in trying to nationalize oil, Milani replied: "Your reading is as important as my intention.
(3.) A moment for definitions: "contingent" as employed here will signify in the philosophical sense, i.e., as opposed to "necessary." If a necessary truth is a truth that is always true, and cannot be otherwise, a contingent truth is a truth that only happens to be true, and could have been otherwise.
(ii) He appeals implicitly to GE: R and D are epistemically equivalent; therefore, they share the epistemic status; since we mistake --GE claims-- the epistemic status for the modal status, we transfer the modal status of the contingent truth D to the epistemically equivalent truth R.
"Most of our cars run on four tires" is a contingent truth because it could have been otherwise; it is not necessarily so.
But I do not hold this to be a necessary truth as Sanders implies; I hold it to be a contingent truth. He writes, |While it is no doubt true that cuteness in humans may now be identified with some such set as the one mentioned in (1), there is nothing essential about the link between any particular set of features and "cuteness"; no set of features is intrinsically "cut"' (p.
The term "law" stands in the series "hypothesis, theory, law," the third term being the one used about a proposition when the relevant scientific community believes strongly in its contingent truth.
While Molinists maintain that the truth of counterfactuals of freedom is not under God's control, Thomists claim that God retains control over all contingent truth, including what humans will freely do.
To begin, we may be certain a priori that any contingent truth whatever is made true, somehow, by the pattern of instantiation of fundamental properties and relations by particular things.
How shall we understand "necessary truth" and its counterpart "contingent truth"?
He grants the intelligibility of "richer" notions of contingency for which it is required, if it is to be a contingent truth that p, that there be available some explanation why p rather than not.