Conversible

Con`ver´si`ble


a.1.Capable of being converted or reversed.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in classic literature ?
He can be a conversible companion if he thinks it worth his while.
David Hume in his essay "Of essay-writing" argues that this form brings together what he calls the learned and the conversible worlds.
He can be a conversible companion if he thinks it worth his while'" (82).
David Hume, in his essay "Of essay-writing," argues that the essay form brings together what he calls the learned and the conversible worlds.
Whereas Locke could confidently address the experience of all from the perspective of "five or six friends meeting at my chamber," for Hume, as one's philosophical identity and authority only results from a "distinction" made by the public, so the ultimate authority of one's ideas rests with their successful assimilation into the widest society of readers in "the conversible world."(45) "For |Hume~ the project is not so much how to philosophize society as how to socialize the philosopher."(46) "The spirit of genius," he writes, "is not kindled from Heaven.
Perhaps William dignified his status in the recollection; perhaps Fielding diminished it; perhaps this footman-cum-amanuensis simply resembled Captain Veale's long-suffering factotum on board the Queen of Portugal, who 'had as many offices as Scrub in the play'.(6) Such combinations of roles were not uncommon on voyages abroad, and William's sudden defection certainly seems to have left Fielding in need of scribal help: the letter cited above also asks John Fielding to send to Lisbon 'a conversible Man to be my Companion in an Evening', who 'must be many Amanuensi<s>)'.(7) By this time William's duties as footman had been assumed by a locally recruited African, and Fielding now seems to have taken the opportunity to seek educated company of the kind he had missed on the voyage.