Coosa River


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Coo·sa River

 (ko͞o′sə)
A river rising in northwest Georgia and flowing about 460 km (285 mi) southwest through eastern Alabama to join the Tallapoosa River near Montgomery and form the Alabama River.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Coosa River - river that rises in northwestern Georgia and flows southwest through eastern Alabama to join the Tallapoosa River near Montgomery and form the Alabama RiverCoosa River - river that rises in northwestern Georgia and flows southwest through eastern Alabama to join the Tallapoosa River near Montgomery and form the Alabama River
Alabama, Camellia State, Heart of Dixie, AL - a state in the southeastern United States on the Gulf of Mexico; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War
Empire State of the South, Georgia, Peach State, GA - a state in southeastern United States; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War
References in periodicals archive ?
Renew Our Rivers began in the spring of 2000 with one Alabama Power employee's vision to clean a stretch of the Coosa River near the company's generating plant in Gadsden.
[14.] Jackson DC (1985) The Influence of Differing Flow Regimes on the Coosa River Tailwater Fishery below Jordan Dam.
In Georgia, the species is restricted to streams within the Coosa River drainage.
All three are tributaries to Tallaseehatchee Creek which serves points west of Jacksonville eventually dumping into the Coosa River. Using the Alabama Water Watch (AWW) bacteriological monitoring standards and monitors certified by AWW, samples were taken monthly for each of the monitor sites and processed according to rigid standards.
Completed in December of 2013, this $250 million gaming casino features an 85,000 square foot gaming floor with 2,500 games and an attached 20 story luxury hotel to capitalize on the spectacular views of the nearby Coosa River. MetalTech-USA Flatlock panels were chosen to clad much of the facade of this remarkable facility augmenting the diverse, natural material palette.
Now, researchers have found a population of one of those species-a freshwater limpet last seen more than 60 years ago and presumed extinct-in a tributary of the heavily dammed Coosa River in Alabama's Mobile River Basin.
It was only known to survive in five areas within the lower Coosa River drainage in Alabama.
Using Rome as a base, they collected and studied the fishes from the headwaters of the Coosa River, as well as the adjacent Chattahoochee and Altamaha river drainages.
She had fished a tournament during the regular season on the Coosa River, the same river system that feeds the lake where the championship was held.
Jeff Garner, the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources' mollusk biologist, rediscovered the cobble elimia and the nodulose Coosa River snail on a dive in the Coosa River.
The proposed critical habitat includes portions of the Tombigbee River drainage in Mississippi and Alabama; portions of the Black Warrior River drainage in Alabama; portions of the Alabama River drainage in Alabama; portions of the Cahaba River drainage in Alabama; portions of the Tallapoosa River drainage in Alabama and Georgia; and portions of the Coosa River drainage in Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee.