Copenhagen interpretation


Also found in: Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Copenhagen interpretation

n
(General Physics) an interpretation of quantum mechanics developed by Niels Bohr and his colleagues at the University of Copenhagen, based on the concept of wave–particle duality and the idea that the observation influences the result of an experiment
References in periodicals archive ?
edu/entries/qm-copenhagen/) Copenhagen Interpretation , consciousness and the physical world are complementary aspects of the same reality.
Among the topics are transcendental versus quantitative meanings of his complementarity principle, his relational holism and the classical-quantum interaction, complementarity and quantum tunneling, individuality and correspondence: an exploration of the history and possible future of Bohrian quantum empiricism, Bohr and the formalism of quantum mechanics, and why QBism is not the Copenhagen interpretation and what John Bell might have thought of it.
Complementarity is at the foundation of the Copenhagen Interpretation and the von Neumann Orthodox QM interpretation but goes beyond these quantum frameworks, as complementary relations are ubiquitous.
In short, just as the wave function in the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum physics is a wave of probability of places in which the electron might be found, our spirit function is all of our potentiality, limited as probability by our historicity and interrelatedness.
Most of the rest of the chapters are concerned with introducing quantum mechanics, the Copenhagen interpretation, and the experiments and other challenges that cause a rift between causality and explanation.
The thought experiment presented a cat that could be alive or dead, based on an earlier random event, which is sometimes described as a paradox and attempts to demonstrate the apparent conflict involved in applying the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics to everyday objects.
An astrophysicist himself, he admits he shares Schrodinger's skepticism about the so-called Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, the theory that would hold the cat was both alive and dead until observed because an electron has both wave and particle properties until measured.
Dixon's latest novel, The Copenhagen Interpretation (officially released on 7 January 2014) includes Wolfe's line "I have a thing to tell you" (10), as well as a variation: "I have a thing or two to tell you" (152).
This cat paradox argument was used by Schrodinger to ridicule the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum theory.
The Copenhagen interpretation maintains that quantum mechanics applies to each individual system such as the behavior of a single electron or atom.
This epistemological approach, promulgated by the school of Niels Bohr, is known as the Copenhagen interpretation of QM.
This idea is associated with what physics folks refer to as the Copenhagen Interpretation.
Full browser ?