Copernicanism


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Related to Copernicanism: Nicolaus Copernicus

Copernicanism

the fundamental theoretical basis of modern astronomy, first demonstrated in the early 16th century by Copernicus, who showed that the earth and the other planets orbit around the sun. Cf. Ptolemaism.
See also: Astronomy
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Most Jesuit savants, however, opted to steer clear of the Scylla of Copernicanism and the Charybdis of atomist physics--perilously encroaching on the doctrine of the Eucharist--and turned to the relatively safer enterprise of experimental physics.
The analytic part consists in isolating key religious, philosophical, and scientific ideas that continue to recur in Kepler's many writings; the synthetic part then shows how each group of ideas actually functioned in his acceptance of Copernicanism and his discovery of his first two laws of planetary motion.
Pitt proposes that Galileo's defense of Copernicanism and rejection of Aristotelian cosmology had more precedent than has been thought, and that he first adopted Copernican astronomy in order to support his theory of the tides, rather than the other way around.
An opening chapter on the reactions of astronomers and theologians to the De revolutionibus of Copernicus (1543) leads into a detailed consideration of Galileo's gradual involvement in the defense of Copernicanism.
In a section of the unpublished Observationum stellarum fixarum, discussed here by Granada, Rothmann developed detailed replies to Brahe's scriptural objections to Copernicanism.
Still, his analysis of the Leiden humanists and their defence of Copernicanism is one of the strong chapters of the book.
Juan Casanovas, in his overview of the state of continental astronomy after the death of Kepler, is less sure of the answer to the question of Riccioli's Copernicanism.
Howell proposes to examine the reception of Copernicanism in Protestant and Catholic Europe in the century after 1543 and to show how it was affected by biblical interpretation.
One cannot claim a definitive conversion of Campanella to Copernicanism nor a definitive abandonment of geocentrism.
By the eighteenth century, even this last concept disappeared, making it possible for the Church to lift the ban on teaching Copernicanism and bringing the medieval cosmos to an end.
Fra ncoise Charles-Daubert shows that even among the skeptics in the seventeenth century, who should have appreciated his support of philosophical freedom, Cremonini was deprecated because of his rejection of Copernicanism.
Rather it distances theology from Aristotelianism, while defending Galileo's right to argue for the compatibility of Copernicanism with the Scriptures.