Corage

Cor´age


n.1.See Courage
To Canterbury with full devout corage.
- Chaucer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pocos tuvieron tal corage y conviccion como el capitan Francisco de Bracamonte, el mismo un comandante de una columna combinada de espanoles y muchos cientos de nahuas auxiliares, cuando recordo a aquellos aliados olvidados y testifico a la corona, "Yo puedo decir con total honestidad que sin ellos nunca hubieramos conquistado esta tierra (3)" (215).
The Cok of kynde ha[thorn]e a crest rede Shape lyke a crowne, token of gret noblesse, By whyche he ha[thorn]e, whyle hit stont on hys hede, As clerkis seyn, corage & hardynes, And of hys berde melancolyk felnes : Aboute hys nek by mercyall apparayll Nature ha[thorn]e yeue hym a stately auentayll.
Courage thinks, but above all feels-from the heart, the old French, corage for 'heart, the innermost feelings.'
No forse, I have lost but a lytyll swete That I have taken upon this hete, My colde corage to abate.
Hobbes, por el contrario, a traves de la solucion del dilema del prisionero y la permisividad para con aquellos subditos de "coraje" "feminoide" (feminine corage) y timidez natural (natural timorousness (116)) que no quieran pelear en la defensa del Estado, sin por ello atribuirles una desercion del servicio, da cuenta de una concepcion segun la cual, donde no hay garantias para la propia vida, no hay obligacion politica (117).
No lengthe of tyme or deeth may this deface, Ne chaunge my corage to another place."
De mun pere ne sai si vus fist onc damage, Kar il fist en meint liu a muz homes utrage, Pur joe crem ke trop ai descovert mun corage (ll.
His chaunged powres at first them selves not felt, Till crudled cold his corage gan assaile, And cheareful bloud in faintnesse chill did melt, Which like a fever fit through all his body swell.
Hall repeatedly asserts the masculine nature of Margaret's character: a "manly woman, using to rule and not to be ruled" (Bullough 176); she "excelled all other, as well in beauty and favor, as in wit and pollicie, and was of stomack and corage, more like to a man, then a woman" (102).
PETERSEN, Dana., MINKLER, Meredith, Breckwich Vasquez, Victoria, and BADEN, Andrea Corage, "Community-based participatory research as a tool for policy change: A case study of the Southern California Environmental Justice Collaborative".
But Chaucer wants us to think of her as possessing this virtue because, in a description found in neither of his sources, he tells us she was "ful devout and humble in hir corage" (131).
Bale's comparison between Askew and Blandina in particular highlights some of the combative and feisty qualities he admires in Askew: successive comparisons underscore Bale's approbation of Askew as 'ferventlye faythfull' (10), 'most lustye in corage', 'lyvelye and quyck' (11), 'hygh stomacked' (12), 'stowte, myghtye and ernest' (12).