corollary

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cor·ol·lar·y

 (kôr′ə-lĕr′ē, kŏr′-)
n. pl. cor·ol·lar·ies
1. A proposition that follows with little or no proof required from one already proven.
2. A deduction or an inference.
3. A natural consequence or effect; a result.
adj.
Consequent; resultant.

[Middle English corolarie, from Latin corōllārium, money paid for a garland, gratuity, from corōlla, small garland; see corolla.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

corollary

(kəˈrɒlərɪ)
n, pl -laries
1. (Logic) a proposition that follows directly from the proof of another proposition
2. an obvious deduction
3. a natural consequence or result
adj
consequent or resultant
[C14: from Latin corollārium money paid for a garland, from Latin corolla garland, from corōna crown]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cor•ol•lar•y

(ˈkɔr əˌlɛr i, ˈkɒr-; esp. Brit., kəˈrɒl ə ri)

n., pl. -lar•ies.
1. Math. a proposition incidentally proved in proving another proposition.
2. an immediate consequence or easily drawn conclusion.
3. a natural consequence or result.
[1325–75; < Late Latin corollārium corollary, in Latin: money paid for a garland, gratuity. See corolla, -ary]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cor·ol·lar·y

(kôr′ə-lĕr′ē)
A statement that follows with little or no proof required from an already proven statement.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corollary - a practical consequence that follows naturally; "blind jealousy is a frequent corollary of passionate love"
aftermath, consequence - the outcome of an event especially as relative to an individual
2.corollary - (logic) an inference that follows directly from the proof of another proposition
illation, inference - the reasoning involved in drawing a conclusion or making a logical judgment on the basis of circumstantial evidence and prior conclusions rather than on the basis of direct observation
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

corollary

noun consequence, result, effect, outcome, sequel, end result, upshot The number of prisoners increased as a corollary of the government's crackdown on violent crime.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

corollary

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
důsledek
Korollar
följdsatskorollarium

corollary

[kəˈrɒlərɪ] Ncorolario m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

corollary

[kəˈrɒləri] ncorollaire m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

corollary

n(logische) Folge, Korollar nt (also Math); this would prove, as a corollary, that …damit würde dann gleichzeitig auch bewiesen, dass …
adjBegleit-
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

corollary

[kəˈrɒlərɪ] ncorollario
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Corallary 4 If X is a second countable space, then A-sInt(A) is countable for every closed subset A [member of] [T.sub.[zeta]].