jute

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Jute

 (jo͞ot)
n.
A member of a Germanic people who invaded Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries ad and settled in the south and southeast and on the Isle of Wight.

[From Middle English Jutes, the Jutes, from Medieval Latin Iutae, from Old English Iotas, Iutan; akin to Old English Gēat, Geat.]

Jute, Jut′ish adj.

jute

 (jo͞ot)
n.
1. Either of two Asian plants (Corchorus capsularis or C. olitorius) yielding a fiber used for sacking and cordage.
2. The fiber obtained from these plants.

[Bengali jhuṭo, from Sanskrit jūṭaḥ, twisted hair, probably of Dravidian origin.]

jute

(dʒuːt)
n
1. (Plants) either of two Old World tropical yellow-flowered herbaceous plants, Corchorus capsularis or C. olitorius, cultivated for their strong fibre: family Tiliaceae
2. (Plants) this fibre, used in making sacks, rope, etc
[C18: from Bengali jhuto, from Sanskrit jūta braid of hair, matted hair]

Jute

(dʒuːt)
n
(Peoples) a member of one of various Germanic tribes, some of whom invaded England in the 6th century ad, settling in Kent

jute

(dʒut)

n.
1. a strong, coarse fiber used for making burlap, gunny, cordage, etc., obtained from two East Indian plants, Corchorus capsularis and C. olitorius, of the linden family.
2. either of these plants.
[1740–50; < Bengali jhuṭo]
jute′like`, adj.

Jute

(dʒut)

n.
a member of a Germanic people that invaded Britain in the 5th century a.d., settling mainly in Kent.
Jut′ish, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jute - a plant fiber used in making rope or sacksjute - a plant fiber used in making rope or sacks
rope - a strong line
bagging, sacking - coarse fabric used for bags or sacks
plant fiber, plant fibre - fiber derived from plants
2.Jute - a member of a Germanic people who conquered England and merged with the Angles and Saxons to become Anglo-Saxons
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Translations
قِنَّب
jutajutový
jute
juta
júta; basttrefjar
džiutas
džuta
jutajutový
Hint keneviri/kendiri

Jute

[dʒuːt] Njuto/a m/f

jute

[dʒuːt] Nyute m

jute

[ˈdʒuːt]
njute m
modif [sack, bag] → de jute; [crop, mill] → de jute

jute

nJute f

jute

[dʒuːt] niuta

jute

(dʒuːt) noun, adjective
(of) the fibre of certain plants found in Pakistan and India, used for making sacks etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a study designed to investigate the antioxidant and analgesic properties of the essential oils of Corchorus olitorius in the leaf, stem, root, fruit and flower, researchers suggested that Corchorus olitorius essential oils may be used for analgesic and antioxidant purposes.
Corchorus olitorius leaves are known to be rich in nutrients such as iron, phosphorus, calcium, potassium, and carotene (4).
Toxic effects of lead exposure in Wistar rats: involvement of oxidative stress and the beneficial role of edible jute (Corchorus olitorius) leaves.
Check the video for a very easy and delicious recipe: Now to the MAIN dish Out of so many main dishes in Egyptian cuisine, no one would pass out on some delicious white rice and "Molokhia" the leaves of Corchorus olitorius) ; and with some crispy chicken, it gets even tastier!
(1): absolute stereostructures of corchoionosides A, B, and C, histamine release inhibitors from the leaves of Vietnamese Corchorus olitorius L.
Adekoya, "Effect of Light Stress on Germination and Growth Parameters of Corchorus olitorius, Celosia argentea, Amaranthus cruentus, Abelmoschus esculentus and Delonix regia," Notulae Scientia Biologicae, vol.
Nwankwo, "Growth and yield response of Corchorus olitorius in the treatment of Arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM, Poultry manure (PM)," Combination of AMPM and Inorganic Fertilizer (NPK).
It occurs as a weed of varying significance in a variety of crops like Ananas comosus, Arachis hypogaea, Celosia argentia, Corchorus olitorius, Glycine max, Gossypium hirsutum, Oryza sativa, Saccharum ofjicinamm, Soighum bicolor, Zea mays (Ogunyemi et al., 2000; Ogunyemi et al., 2005; Chauhan & Johnson, 2009) and horticultural enterprises (Waterhouse, 1994).
Spider plant is ranked second amongst the top five indigenous leafy vegetables consumed as relish which include, Amaranthus blitum (pigweed), Solanum scabrum (nightshade), Corchorus olitorius (jute mallow) and Vigna unguiculata (cowpea) [2].
(2012) Inhibitory effect of polyphenol-rich extracts of jute leaf (Corchorus olitorius) on key enzyme linked to type 2 diabetes (a-amylase and hypertension (angiotensin I converting) in vitro.
Effects of different concentrations of NPK fertilizers on growth and development of wild okra (Corchorus olitorius).
Koshioka et al., "Phenolic antioxidants from the leaves of Corchorus olitorius L.," Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.