Corn Laws


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Related to Corn Laws: Anti corn law league

Corn Laws

pl n
(Historical Terms) the laws introduced in Britain in 1804 to protect domestic farmers against foreign competition by the imposition of a heavy duty on foreign corn: repealed in 1846. See also Anti-Corn Law League

Corn Laws

1815–46 British legislation regulating grain imports. They were beneficial to farmers but caused staple food shortages in larger, particularly industrial, towns and in impoverished rural areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1896 two pies were made to mark the |50th anniversary of the Repeal of the Corn Laws.
Responsible for creating the modern police force (hence their nickname of 'bobbies' or 'Peelers'), he was also involved in several other key pieces of liberal legislation including Catholic Emancipation in 1829, the enfranchising Reform Act of 1832, the introduction of income tax in peacetime ten years later, and the repeal of the Corn Laws not long before he left office in 1846.
24) Richard Cobden 1804-1865: Free trade campaigner, helped abolish Corn Laws.
The repeal of the corn laws in 1846 meant that there was a lot of libertarianism in the revolution of 1848.
Further, piffling, paltry legislation was enacted in the Corn Laws of 1830; praised by the establishment, and thrashed into schoolchildren not paying attention during history lessons.
Peel fails Harris' test of a successful party leader because he divided the party in 1846 when he repealed the Corn Laws to help relieve famine in Ireland.
Bright was its greatest orator and worked intimately in tandem with his greatest friend, Richard Cobden, to spread the campaign for free trade throughout the north and then across the land, culminating in the repeal of the Corn Laws in 1846.
One is the repeal of England's Corn Laws by Prime Minister Robert Peel in 1848.
The triumphant Taylor brothers - Martin and Lee - are relatively new to ownership and have "course form" as their grandfather was a bookie and tic-tac here back in the days of the Corn Laws.
To do this it concentrates on specific events: Catholic emancipation and Ireland, currency reform, his work as Home Secretary, his relations with what became the Conservative party, the repeal of the Corn Laws, and the last four years of Peel's life.