Corn Laws


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Related to Corn Laws: Anti corn law league

Corn Laws

pl n
(Historical Terms) the laws introduced in Britain in 1804 to protect domestic farmers against foreign competition by the imposition of a heavy duty on foreign corn: repealed in 1846. See also Anti-Corn Law League
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Corn Laws

1815–46 British legislation regulating grain imports. They were beneficial to farmers but caused staple food shortages in larger, particularly industrial, towns and in impoverished rural areas.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
GRAHAME Buxton is so right to highlight the commemoration of the brutal 1819 Peterloo Massacre against peaceful demonstrators who simply wanted a political voice for rights and freedoms; which an elite establishment was not willing to acknowledge, (Viewpoints, August 16.) One issue was the Corn Laws which imposed tariffs on the import of wheat to protect the profits of the landed gentry.
Though an instinctive free trader, Liverpool therefore supported Britain's first Corn Laws. Passed in 1815, these statutes banned grain importation until the domestic price reached a particular threshold.
But his efforts to repeal the Corn Laws had led to him being savagely attacked by members of his own party.
I assume he was talking about the Chartists, Peterloo and the Corn Laws in the 19th century.
Over two centuries, battles over electoral reform, the Corn Laws, free trade, the House of Lords, and the Irish question were eventually resolved by reform and compromise.
So, it could soon be time for the Tories to come to terms with their 21st-century Corn Laws moment, face a split, and lead the country into EFTA.
And by Christmas, May will be chewed up and spat out by her rabble of Conservative members of parliament who are intent on devouring their own as never seen since the days of the Corn Laws in 1846.
Thompson's themes of class struggle in the early years of capitalist industrialization, revisited in part 1, 1800-1870, in the turmoil over the Corn Laws and New Poor Law.
A party that last split in 1846 over the Corn Laws is the most likely to survive Brexit basically intact.
Nowadays, Sir Robert Peel is remembered as the founder of the Metropolitan Police, prison and judicial reforms, the Repeal of the Corn Laws and the father of the modern Conservative Party.
Brexit, however, transcends party loyalty and MPs now have to make known what they truly believe in on an issue, whose importance is only matched by the divisiveness of the Corn Laws in the 1840s.