corpus cavernosum

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corpus cavernosum

(ˌkævəˈnəʊsəm)
n, pl corpora cavernosa
(Anatomy) either of two masses of erectile tissue in the penis of mammals
[New Latin, literally: cavernous body]
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Angiography showed a fistulous communication between the right bulbo-urethral artery and corpora cavernosa with intense arterial blush over the right corpora (Fig.
Radical prostatectomy can injure the penis' nerves to the spongy tissue, the corpora cavernosa, which are responsible for initiating an erection.
True complete diphallia is defined by complete penile duplication, each with two corpora cavernosa and one corpus spongiosum (8).
congestion of the corpora cavernosa occurring due to mechanical compression of the abdominal veins by the enlarge spleen; Sludging of leukaemic cells in the corpora cavernosa and the penile dorsal vein; infiltration of the sacral nerves and central nervous system with leukaemic cells.
Ontogenetic profile of the expression of thyroid hormone receptors in rat and human corpora cavernosa of the penis.
[ET.sub.B] receptors were concentrated in the periphery of the corpora cavernosa and in their transition with the tunica albuginea, whereas [ET.sub.A] receptors were diffusely distributed and in a higher concentration throughout the corpus cavernosum (Figure 2).
Furthermore, it has been reported that low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy (LI-ESWT), applied to the corpora cavernosa of patients with vascular ED, improves the quality of the erection by inducing angiogenesis mediated by intra- and extracellular mechanisms such as increased levels of nitric oxide synthase, nitric oxide, and vascular endothelial growth factors [12-15].
Necrotizing infection of the corpora cavernosa is rare and generally provoked by trauma, urethral instrumentation, or penile injection while abscess of the corpus spongiosum has been described in the setting of a rectal malignancy [1, 2].
In the setting of lung cancer, penile metastases most commonly involve the corpora cavernosa in the shaft with one meta-analysis reporting 85% of lesions in this location [3, 6,10].
We present a rare case of complete urethral rupture with rupture of both corpora cavernosa.
The loss of circulation deprives the corpora cavernosa of oxygen and causes a painful, rigid erection.