cannibalization

(redirected from Corporate Cannibalism)
Also found in: Financial.

can·ni·bal·ize

 (kăn′ə-bə-līz′)
v. can·ni·bal·ized, can·ni·bal·iz·ing, can·ni·bal·iz·es
v.tr.
1. To remove serviceable parts from (damaged airplanes, for example) for use in the repair of other equipment of the same kind.
2. To deprive of vital elements or resources, such as personnel, equipment, or funding, for use elsewhere.
3. To draw on as a major source: "cannibalizes the lives of his wife and friends for his second-rate novels" (Washington Post).
4. To practice cannibalism on.
v.intr.
To practice cannibalism.

can′ni·bal·i·za′tion (-bə-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

cannibalization

[ˌkænɪbəlaɪˈzeɪʃən] N [of machine, product] → canibalización f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cannibalization

n (Econ) → Kannibalisierung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
This often translates into a decline of smaller economic actors pushed out of business or "swallowed up" through mergers and acquisitions, or what can be called "corporate cannibalism."
This often translates into a gradual decline of smaller economic actors, which are pushed out of business or "swallowed up" through mergers and acquisitions, or what can be called "corporate cannibalism." This is more or less what happened in the food and agricultural sectors beginning in the 1980s, at the beginning of the so-called "deregulation revolution." It is exactly during this period that worldwide dietary patterns dramatically changed toward ultra-processed products.
The book concludes with an education-for-action resource section offering tools to fight what one farmer -calls corporate cannibalism, not fair competition.
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