Corpus Juris Civilis


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Related to Corpus Juris Civilis: Justinian, Theodora

Corpus Juris Civilis

(sɪˈvaɪlɪs)
n
(Law) law the body of Roman or civil law consolidated by Justinian in the 6th century ad. It consists of four parts, the Institutes, Digest, Code, and Novels
[New Latin, literally: body of civil law]
References in periodicals archive ?
In continental Europe, students began studying civil law by reading the Institutes and the Digest of Justinian, the 6th-century Byzantine emperor who codified ancient Roman law into the Corpus Juris Civilis and affirmed natural law as the underlying source of positive law.
Contrast this, for example, with the admonitions of those Ten Commandments that directly regulate the thoughts (2) and actions (3) of the citizenry, or with Justinian I's Corpus Juris Civilis, which, while providing certain individual protections, placed few, if any, restraints upon governmental action.
The Corpus Juris Civilis, which was established between 529 and 535 AD attempted to pull together Rome's history of law into one document.