pro-form

(redirected from Correlative pronoun)

pro·form

or pro-form  (prō′fôrm′)
n.
An item in a sentence, typically a pronoun, verb, or adverb, that substitutes for a constituent phrase or clause, as the words he and so in the sentence He said so, with the pronoun he replacing a noun phrase such as the president and the adverb so replacing a clause such as that he would leave today.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pro-form

n
(Grammar) a word having grammatical function but assuming the meaning of an antecedent word or phrase for which it substitutes: the word "does" is a pro-form for "understands Greek" in "I can't understand Greek but he does".
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pro-form

(ˈproʊˌfɔrm)

n.
a word used to replace or substitute for a word, phrase, or clause belonging to a given grammatical class, as a pronoun used to replace a noun or noun phrase, there used to replace an adverbial phrase of place, or so used to substitute for a clause, as in Have they gone? I think so.
[1960–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

pro-form

[ˈprəʊˌfɔːm] N (Ling) → pro forma f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hock reaffirms his own claim that the Sanskrit relative clause is conjoined to the main clause, citing cases where there is no clear relationship between the relative and correlative pronouns, such as relative clauses serving as conditional clauses, and relative clauses containing interrogation and imperative modality.