corsair

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Related to Corsairs: Barbary Corsairs

cor·sair

 (kôr′sâr′)
n.
1. A pirate or privateer, especially along the Barbary Coast.
2. A swift pirate ship, often operating with official sanction.

[French corsaire, from Old Provençal corsari, from Old Italian corsaro, from Medieval Latin cursārius, from cursus, plunder, from Latin, run, course; see course.]

corsair

(ˈkɔːsɛə)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a pirate
2. (Nautical Terms) a privateer, esp of the Barbary Coast
[C15: from Old French corsaire pirate, from Medieval Latin cursārius, from Latin cursus a running, course]

cor•sair

(ˈkɔr sɛər)

n.
1. a fast pirate ship.
2. a pirate, esp. of the Barbary Coast.
[1540–50; < Middle French corsaire < Occitan corsar(i) < Upper Italian corsaro < Medieval Latin cursārius= Latin curs(us) course + -ārius -ary]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corsair - a pirate along the Barbary Coastcorsair - a pirate along the Barbary Coast  
buccaneer, sea robber, sea rover, pirate - someone who robs at sea or plunders the land from the sea without having a commission from any sovereign nation
2.corsair - a swift pirate ship (often operating with official sanction)
pirate ship, pirate - a ship that is manned by pirates

corsair

noun pirate, rover, buccaneer, freebooter, sea rover Treasure galleons were often attacked by corsairs and pirates.
Translations

corsair

[ˈkɔːsɛəʳ] Ncorsario m

corsair

n (= ship)Piratenschiff nt, → Korsar m; (= pirate)Pirat m, → Korsar m
References in classic literature ?
What is there to prevent our arming corsairs at Belle-Isle?
Though by the repeated bloody chastisements they have received at the hands of European cruisers, the audacity of these corsairs has of late been somewhat repressed; yet, even at the present day, we occasionally hear of English and American vessels, which, in those waters, have been remorselessly boarded and pillaged.
On this expedition was taken the galley called the Prize, whose captain was a son of the famous corsair Barbarossa.
D'Artagnan pronounced these words with an indefinable tone of feigned bonhomie, for he knew very well that the victim of pirates was an old corsair, and had engaged him in consequence of that knowledge.
who came in hungry at dinner-time; and not in the least like a nobleman turned Corsair out of pure scorn for his race, or like a renegade with a turban and crescent, unless it were in the irritability of his temper.
If I had been born a corsair or a pirate, a brigand, genteel highwayman or patriot--and they're the same thing,' thought Mr Tappertit, musing among the nine-pins, 'I should have been all right.
Of articles collected on his various expeditions, there was such a vast miscellany that it was like the dwelling of an amiable Corsair.
He followed up his first literary success by publishing during the next four years his brief and vigorous metrical romances, most of them Eastern in setting, 'The Giaour' (pronounced by Byron 'Jower'), 'The Bride of Abydos,' 'The Corsair,' 'Lara,' 'The Siege of Corinth,' and 'Parisina.
Lords of the Sea: A History of the Barbary Corsairs.
The first Corsairs appeared in both standard and de-luxe mode, powered by a 1498cc, four-cylinder, five-main bearing unit and were available as either a two-door or four-door saloon.
The Corsairs were replaced by WW II-vintage F6F Hellcats that had been stored in the Arizona desert.
The Moorpark College football team shut down visiting Santa Monica during the first half and held a 14-0 lead with less than 3 minutes remaining when the Corsairs began another of their infamous comebacks.