Cosimo I


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Cosimo I

(Italian ˈkɔːzimo)
n
(Biography) See Medici3
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
D'Aglio argues that contrary to received historical wisdom, King Charles V of Spain, Alessandro's father-in-law, had arranged for Lorenzo's murder rather than Duke Cosimo I. Cosimo's library and early education are the topic of the next chapter, which suggests that the information in his library helped him navigate an increasingly complex and global world (Assonitis).
In The Medicean Succession Gregory Murry presents an impressive range of evidence in an effort to support his thesis that Duke Cosimo I gained legitimacy and maintained his rule in a still fervently republican Florence by forging an image of himself that reflected many of the ideas that pervaded Florentine thought, custom, and belief.
Author Corretti, a scholar of early modern Italian art, examines the androgynous appearance of the hero in the sculpture and concludes that the sculptor Cellini engages with the limitations of male power in early modern Florence and implies that Cosimo I deEMedici was brought to power by his mother and his wife.
Cosimo I's use of local religious traditions, values, and assumptions adds a new dimension to the scholarly consideration of how the Medici principality succeeded because of, not in spite of, the preexisting republican culture of Florence.
River gods are strategically placed: this study focuses on some outstanding examples, both visually and iconographically, from the Rooms of Leo X, Clement VII, Cosimo I, and the Salone dei Cinquecento.
Cosimo I de' Medici as collector; antiquities and archaeology in sixteenth-century Florence.
The subject is thought to be Cosimo I de Medici, Duke of Florence and Grand Duke of Tuscany, painted by renaissance master Maso da San Friano around 1560.
Medici Women: Portraits of Power, Love and Betrayal from the Court of Duke Cosimo I. By Gabrielle Langdon.
Analysis of the remains of Cosimo I, said to have been crippled with gout during his lifetime, has shown that he suffered from a severe form of arthritis, while the recent opening of the tomb of Filippino, son of Grand Duke Francesco I, has revealed a skeleton three years younger than the age Filippino had reached at his death.
Here we are concerned with Florence under Cosimo I (1537-1574), the role of the Accademia Fiorentina and four writers (Tullia d' Aragona, Antonfrancesco Grazzini, Alfonso de' Pazzi and Girolamo Amelonghi) who complained, postured or 'transgressed the boundaries of cultural acceptability'.
Florentine musicians were drawn more to Petrarch than to Dante; among them was Matteo Rampollini, who had written madrigals for the wedding of Cosimo I de' Medici in 1539.