cosmological argument


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Related to cosmological argument: Ontological argument, Teleological argument

cosmological argument

n
(Philosophy) philosophy one of the arguments that purport to prove the existence of God from empirical facts about the universe, esp the argument to the existence of a first cause. Compare ontological argument1, teleological argument
References in periodicals archive ?
The axiological explanation of nature and its laws circumvents the cosmological argument rather than engendering some version of it.
He applies this strategy to a variety of topics, including the argument from design, the ontological argument, the cosmological argument, religious experience, Pascal's Wager, miracles, and the problem of evil.
The second deals with the cosmological argument, especially the principle of sufficient reason.
As a systematic natural theology, the Kemetic cosmological argument arrives in a cosmology which explains logically the movements and stability of the bodies of the universe, at astronomic and subatomic levels through a single theory; hence, it is a solar holistic "theory of everything".
The Kalam Cosmological Argument; Volume 2: Scientific Evidence for the Beginning of the Universe
In several places Hobbes gives what appears to be a version of the cosmological argument. According to one popular interpretation, these are not actually arguments at all but naturalistic descriptions of a psychological process.
The cosmological argument for the existence of God however outweighs all other contemplations debated upon considering the deliberation that everything that begins to exist has a cause.
7-134) commences with the kalam cosmological argument for God based on the temporal production of the world, and thereby its need for a creator.
(23) See the discussion from Craig and Sinclair, "The Kalam Cosmological Argument," 132-82.
The cosmological argument is one of the three philosophical arguments used by philosophers and theologians to rationally prove or demonstrate God's existence.
It is informative, however, to compare those passages to an argument from Letter from a Gentleman in which Hume qualifies his critique of the cosmological argument by reminding that he has left the ontological argument untouched.
Thomas Aquinas' cosmological argument for the existence of God.