cosmological constant

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cosmological constant

n.
A constant introduced into the general theory of relativity, proportional to the energy density of the vacuum, and related to the rate of expansion or contraction of the universe. The vacuum energy represented by the cosmological constant is a form of dark energy.
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Noun1.cosmological constant - an arbitrary constant in the equations of general relativity theory
constant - a number representing a quantity assumed to have a fixed value in a specified mathematical context; "the velocity of light is a constant"
Translations
kosmologinen vakio
References in periodicals archive ?
In a paper dealing with the cosmological constant problem [6], the time evolution of the universe world line was compared with the growing of a polymer chain by making use of a Flory-like free energy.
Now, two physicists -- Lawrence Krauss of Arizona State University and James Dent of the University of Louisiana-Lafayette -- suggest that the recently discovered Higgs boson could provide a possible "portal" to physics that could help explain some of the attributes of the enigmatic dark energy, and help resolve the cosmological constant problem.
Now, two physicists - Lawrence Krauss of Arizona State University and James Dent of University of Louisiana-Lafayette - suggest that the recently discovered Higgs boson could provide a possible "portal" to physics that could help explain some of the attributes of the enigmatic dark energy and help resolve the cosmological constant problem.