Coulomb force


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Coulomb force

n.
The force exerted by stationary objects bearing electric charge on other stationary objects bearing electric charge, being repulsive if the objects have charges of the same sign, and attractive if the objects have charges of opposite signs. The strength of the force is described by Coulomb's law. Also called electrostatic force.

[After Charles Augustin de Coulomb.]
References in periodicals archive ?
In order for this radiative force to cause the deuterons to fuse, it must be larger than the repulsive Coulomb force at the seperation where the attractive strong force can take over and fuse the two deuterons, a distance of [d.sub.s] = 1.6 x [10.sup.-15] m.
(When two charges are very close, this coulomb force can be very strong.)
The solar sail is a recent invention in the domain of propellantless propulsion of the spacecraft [1], based on electrostatic Coulomb force. The force results from the momentum exchange between the flow of ions or electrons and the positively charged or negatively charged conductive body, respectively.
Stability of NPs depends on the intermolecular forces among them, such as van der Waals force and Coulomb force. Intermolecular forces of NPs are influenced by the size of NPs and their distance, so which can affect the aggregation behavior of NPs in water.
Around 1930, a theory called field theory, was developed that the electromagnetic force arises due to the exchange of photons between the electric charges (Coulomb force).
But as more and more protons get packed into a nucleus, the strong force begins to be overwhelmed by the Coulomb force, which causes particles of the same charge to repel each other.
The first analytical analysis of forced vibrations with friction sliding was performed by den Hartog (1931), who approximated the non-linear friction Coulomb force as an equivalent viscous damping.
The chaos-regularity border is qualitatively defined by comparing and equating the strengths of the Coulomb force with the magnetic force acting on the moving point charge e with mass [m.sub.e].
Simulation time has been dramatically reduced by an embedded "MD Engine(R)," a dedicated computation board for high-speed computation of nonbonded interactions such as coulomb force and intermolecular force that account for more than 99% in many cases of molecular dynamics simulation.
As it passes through a plasma, the high energy beam will redistribute the electrons so that the net Coulomb force is decreased but the magnetic force is not affected.
As a counter example to the gravitational force, consider the free space Coulomb force ([e.sup.2]/[r.sup.2]) between two charges e separated by the distance r.
Components of the Coulomb force per unit volume are determined as the product of space charge density and the field strength: