Council of Trent


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Related to Council of Trent: Counter Reformation

Council of Trent

n
(Roman Catholic Church) the council of the Roman Catholic Church that met between 1545 and 1563 at Trent in S Tyrol. Reacting against the Protestants, it reaffirmed traditional Catholic beliefs and formulated the ideals of the Counter-Reformation
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Noun1.Council of Trent - a council of the Roman Catholic Church convened in Trento in three sessions between 1545 and 1563 to examine and condemn the teachings of Martin Luther and other Protestant reformers; redefined the Roman Catholic doctrine and abolished various ecclesiastical abuses and strengthened the papacy
council - (Christianity) an assembly of theologians and bishops and other representatives of different churches or dioceses that is convened to regulate matters of discipline or doctrine
References in classic literature ?
It was gravely said by some of the prelates in the Council of Trent, where the doctrine of the Schoolmen bare great sway, that the Schoolmen were like astronomers, which did feign eccentrics and epicycles, and such engines of orbs, to save the phenomena; though they knew there were no such things; and in like manner, that the Schoolmen had framed a number of subtle and intricate axioms, and theorems, to save the practice of the church.
The term 'Council of Trent' was used loosely in my time as chief medical officer of St.
It explains music theory and the practice of sacred music at the beginning of the 16th century, the historical context, and the cultural atmosphere of the time and the problems of contemporaneous sacred music; the reformers' perspectives on music, sacred music, and its functions in the lives of the faithful, including the theory and practice of music in Lutheran churches, the Calvinist tradition, other Evangelical Churches, and the Church of England, as well as the role of music at the Council of Trent; and the role of music as an instrument of propaganda and confessionalization, how it overcame the confessional walls, and women's music within the context of the European reformations.
I do not care to go back to the time of the Council of Trent. This is the 21st century.
In the decades between the Sack of Rome in 1527 and the closing of the Council of Trent in 1563, a significant number of high-ranking Catholic clergy and aristocratic laypeople in Italy had hopes of reconciliation with Protestants and a re-unification of the Church.
She explores these doubts and epistemological anxieties through case studies of the works of several intellectual figures from the two centuries or so after the Council of Trent. Most of these figures are Jesuits or ex-Jesuits (such as Jesuits Pedro Juan Perpinan, Famiano Strada, Francisco Suarez, Leonardo Lessius; and ex-Jesuits Agostino Mascardi and Paolo Beni).
In his latest work, Trent: What Happened at the Council, O'Malley similarly insists that the Council of Trent must be examined in light of sixteenth-century political, diplomatic, and religious events beyond the small city of Trent, located in the northern reaches of the Italian peninsula.
IT wasn't until the mid 1500s that the Council of Trent deemed marriage to be one of the Protestant Church's sacraments and at that time it was largely a ceremony for wealthier people.
In the latter case, 1563 saw the conclusion of the Council of Trent, the first session of which had opened in 1545, with the twenty-fifth and final session convened on December 3-4, 1563.
The Council of Trent, which met over the course of 18 years during the 16th century, was one of the most important of the ecumenical councils in the history of the Catholic Church, even if the exact nature of the Council's decisions is relatively obscure to even modern-day Catholics.
In the introduction and first three chapters, Alfani provides an overview of godparent practice in the history of Christianity, up to the Council of Trent. The practice emerged only when infant baptism became widespread, as an outgrowth of the sponsores employed in adult baptism.

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