countertransference

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coun·ter·trans·fer·ence

 (koun′tər-trăns-fûr′əns, -trăns′fər-)
n.
Psychological transference by a psychotherapist in reaction to the emotions, experiences, or problems of a patient undergoing treatment.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.countertransference - the psychoanalyst's displacement of emotion onto the patient or more generally the psychoanalyst's emotional involvement in the therapeutic interaction
transference - (psychoanalysis) the process whereby emotions are passed on or displaced from one person to another; during psychoanalysis the displacement of feelings toward others (usually the parents) is onto the analyst
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

countertransference

n (psych) contratransferencia
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Strategies for counterresistance: Toward sociotransformative constructivism and learning to teach science for diversity and for understanding.
Both the behavioral and affective dimensions are dominant here: Action occurs through the distribution of content via MDC, but affect (e.g., emotions and symbols) is also displayed and developed when reporting the success of the undertaken actions or if encountering counterresistance. A typical example of this would be the pride that comes with sharing images of a crowd after a street protest--or the anger that results if police brutality has occurred during the protest--all the while maintaining the agenda until the desired change occurs.
techniques to design 'counterresistance techniques' to break down detainees" (p.