coup d'état

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Related to Coup d'etats: coup d'état

coup d'é·tat

 (ko͞o′ dā-tä′)
n. pl. coups d'état (ko͞o′) or coup d'états (dā-täz′)
The sudden overthrow of a government by a usually small group of persons in or previously in positions of authority.

[French : coup, blow, stroke + de, of + état, state.]

coup d'état

(ˈkuː deɪˈtɑː; French ku deta)
n, pl coups d'état (ˈkuːz deɪˈtɑː; French ku deta)
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a sudden violent or illegal seizure of government
[French, literally: stroke of state]

coup d'état

A French phrase meaning blow of state, used to mean a sudden overthrow of a government.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coup d'état - a sudden and decisive change of government illegally or by forcecoup d'etat - a sudden and decisive change of government illegally or by force
group action - action taken by a group of people
countercoup - a sudden and decisive overthrow of a government that gained power by a coup d'etat

coup d'état

noun overthrow, takeover, coup, rebellion, putsch, seizure of power, palace revolution The government put down an attempted coup d'état last week.
Translations

coup d'état

[ˈkuːdeɪˈtɑː] ncoup m d'État

coup

(kuː) noun
1. a sudden successful action. He achieved a real coup by completing this deal.
2. a coup d'état. There's been a coup in one of the African republics.
coup d'état (kuːdeiˈtaː) plural coups d'état (kuːdei-)
– a sudden and violent change in government. The president was killed during the coup d'état.

coup

(kuː) noun
1. a sudden successful action. He achieved a real coup by completing this deal.
2. a coup d'état. There's been a coup in one of the African republics.
coup d'état (kuːdeiˈtaː) plural coups d'état (kuːdei-)
– a sudden and violent change in government. The president was killed during the coup d'état.
References in classic literature ?
"What about the dinner?" he asked; "the grand event, the coup d'etat?"
"And you ask me why I call it a coup d'etat?" Arobin had put on his coat, and he stood before her and asked if his cravat was plumb.
"Come to take part in our coup d'etat?" he said, confidently pronouncing the French words with a bad accent.
a coup d'etat, and surrounded by applauding armies, welcomed by the thunders of cannon, he mounts a throne and waves before an astounded world the sceptre of a mighty empire!
At the time when all was matured for action, our readers may, perhaps, like to look behind the scenes, and see the final coup d'etat.
After this coup d'etat the Right began to work in silence, but the Left discoursed at length.
It was A-Kor, and at sight of him there rose exclamations of surprise, of pleasure, and of anger, as the various factions recognized the coup d'etat that had been arranged so cunningly.
"I'll strike this worthy idiot dumb with a coup d'etat," thought the housekeeper, "and vanish before she recovers herself."
As the delving into linguistics is necessitated by the phenomenon of the no ending series military Coup d'etats which plagued the post-independence from the former Anglo-Egyptian Condominium on the dawn of Sunday the First January 1956, I find myself is obliged to be more pedantic into this linguistic digression, pardon me, my dear readers.
He was referring to coup d'etats staged by disgruntled soldiers against past administrations.
Historians have cited minor attempts at coup d'etats since then, including the days between President Franklin D.
In all military coup d'etats in Pakistan there was a direct American connection.