court order

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court order

n.
An order issued by a court, usually at the request of a party to a case, directing a party or participant in a case to take a certain action.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

court order

An order from a court requiring someone to do or not do something.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.court order - a writ issued by a court of law requiring a person to do something or to refrain from doing something
divestiture - an order to an offending party to rid itself of property; it has the purpose of depriving the defendant of the gains of wrongful behavior; "the court found divestiture to be necessary in preventing a monopoly"
judicial writ, writ - (law) a legal document issued by a court or judicial officer
writ of execution, execution - a routine court order that attempts to enforce the judgment that has been granted to a plaintiff by authorizing a sheriff to carry it out
gag order - a court order restricting information or comment by the participants involved in a lawsuit; "imposing a gag order on members of the press violates the First Amendment"
garnishment - a court order to an employer to withhold all or part of an employee's wages and to send the money to the court or to the person who won a lawsuit against the employee
interdict, interdiction - a court order prohibiting a party from doing a certain activity
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said: 'It is on record that INEC has been respecting court orders religiously and very much up its responsibility as an unbiased electoral umpire that has withdrawn over 64 certificates of return based on various court orders and with valid reasons to date.
The governor said many of the court orders tycoons use to evict people are fake.
ISLAMABAD -- The Supreme Court on Thursday directed all four provinces for implementation of court orders in mineral water companies case in 30 days.
Justice Jawad Hassan of the high court heard a petition seeking the court orders to secure the underground water in Pakistan.
The petitioners had also moved a contempt of court application against the private school managements over non-compliance with the apex court orders. Representing a private school, a lawyer submitted a revised fee challan and stated that his client had started implementation on the court orders.
While hearing the contempt of court proceedings against private schools over non-compliance of the court orders, the SHC bench also sought details of private schools that increased fee without the approval of the Sindh government.
The court, while questioning the lawyer of private schools, also inquired about implementation on the previous court orders.
CHARLIE Flanagan has vowed to probe how security firms carry out High Court Orders after the eviction of housing protesters.
The Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders disciplined 13 attorneys--disbarring four, suspending five, and publicly reprimanding four.
Police defended holding the two Iranians, arguing that it was the best option."We would not perceive such a line of action as a wilful, or deliberate disobedience of court orders.
PESHAWAR -- As private schools remained closed for the second day, the Peshawar High Court (PHC) directed the provincial government to confiscate the administration and accounts of schools participating in the strike and violating court orders.
During the hearing, the court asked as to why oath was not administered to Kumar despite court orders.