courtesy title

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courtesy title

n.
1. A title of no legal validity that is assumed or granted by custom, such as the academic title professor given to any instructor at a college.
2.
a. In Great Britain, the title that the heir of a high-ranking peer customarily uses, consisting of a secondary title accorded to the peer.
b. In Great Britain, the prefixes Lord and Lady added to the given names of the younger children of dukes and marquises or the Honourable added to the children of viscounts and barons.

courtesy title

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any of several titles having no legal significance, such as those borne by the children of peers

cour′tesy ti`tle


n.
a title allowed by custom, as to the children of dukes.
[1860–65]
References in classic literature ?
Wyatt's work was continued by his poetical disciple and successor, Henry Howard, who, as son of the Duke of Norfolk, held the courtesy title of Earl of Surrey.
Sutton, who died in December, scored a big victory at the Democrat when, through his stubbornness as much as anything else, he persuaded the newspaper to use courtesy titles (Mrs.
The courtesy of the courtesy titles "Mr" "Mrs" or "Ms" is only restored if the person's name is cleared.
At Hillside, they address instructors by the courtesy titles "Mr.
However, nowadays the limited options for courtesy titles available when completing many application forms, especially when on-line, are simply to ensure consistency and to assist in the automated processing of applications.
When the couple married in June 1999, they agreed with the Queen that any children would not be styled HRH but would have courtesy titles as sons or daughters of an earl.
In June 1999, the Queen decided - with the agreement of Edward and Sophie - that any children they might have would not be styled 'HRH' but would have courtesy titles as sons or daughters of an Earl.
In June 1999, the Queen decided - with the agreement of Edward and Sophie - that any children they might have would not be styled ``HRH'' but would have courtesy titles as sons or daughters of an Earl.
These days, most newspapers don't use courtesy titles such as "Ms.
A newspaper that uses courtesy titles for the men and women appearing in its news columns sometimes receives reader queries regarding its use of such titles.
The Associated Press stopped using courtesy titles for women - Mrs.