cowpea

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cow·pea

 (kou′pē′)
n.
1. An annual African plant (Vigna unguiculata) in the pea family, widely cultivated in warm regions for food, forage, and soil improvement.
2. An edible seed of this plant. In both senses also called black-eyed pea.

cowpea

(ˈkaʊˌpiː)
n
1. (Plants) a leguminous tropical climbing plant, Vigna sinensis, producing long pods containing edible pealike seeds: grown for animal fodder and sometimes as human food
2. (Plants) Also called: black-eyed pea the seed of this plant

cow•pea

(ˈkaʊˌpi)

n.
1. a forage plant, Vignaunguiculata, of the legume family, extensively cultivated in the southern U.S.
2. the seed of this plant, used for food.
Also called black-eyed pea.
[1810–20, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cowpea - fruit or seed of the cowpea plant
legume - the fruit or seed of any of various bean or pea plants consisting of a case that splits along both sides when ripe and having the seeds attach to one side of the case
cowpea plant, Vigna sinensis, Vigna unguiculata, black-eyed pea, cowpea - sprawling Old World annual cultivated especially in southern United States for food and forage and green manure
2.cowpea - sprawling Old World annual cultivated especially in southern United States for food and forage and green manurecowpea - sprawling Old World annual cultivated especially in southern United States for food and forage and green manure
black-eyed pea, cowpea - eaten fresh as shell beans or dried
legume, leguminous plant - an erect or climbing bean or pea plant of the family Leguminosae
genus Vigna, Vigna - genus of vines or erect herbs having trifoliate leaves and yellowish or purplish flowers; of warm or tropical regions; most species often placed in genus Phaseolus
black-eyed pea, cowpea - fruit or seed of the cowpea plant
3.cowpea - eaten fresh as shell beans or driedcowpea - eaten fresh as shell beans or dried
legume - the seedpod of a leguminous plant (such as peas or beans or lentils)
cowpea plant, Vigna sinensis, Vigna unguiculata, black-eyed pea, cowpea - sprawling Old World annual cultivated especially in southern United States for food and forage and green manure
References in periodicals archive ?
36% [7] discover an increase in the protein contents of the 30% by addition of cow pea flour (CF) in biscuits dough and 20% cow pea flour (CF)[8] report that the moisture content of biscuits was found to be increased with increase in proportion of dried carrot pomace powder[9] revealed that there was no significant difference observed among the industry wise category of biscuit samples in the analysis of moisture, protein, sugar and ash.
The results revealed that jute bag displayed the most elevated percent germination in all legumes (84-96) % with the exception of kabuli chick pea, desi chick pea, garbanzo bean and cow pea which demonstrated improved percent germination when filter paper was utilized as substrata.
Launched in 2007, the Program for Africa's Seed System is partnering with 80 companies across the continent to date, in producing professionally certified seed for an array of African staple crops such as maize, cassava, millet, rice, sorghum, beans, sweet potatoes, cow pea and groundnuts.
In Sudan many types of legume are used for human food and animal feed such as faba bean, kidney bean, chick pea, lablab bean, cow pea.
The maximum growth performance and yield of a cow pea was observed in the Aspergillus sp.
Among the 9 and 4 types of indigenous vegetables that could be accessed from the local markets and at household farm level, respectively cow pea leaves were the most popular (Fig.
4) Hunter's Specialties Vita-Rock Summer Mix contains Nugget Pea, Iron and Clay Cow Pea, Cow Pea, Trailing Soybean, Peridovic Sunflowers, and Wild Game Food Sorghum.
Bulletin 19 (1910), "Some Possibilities of the Cow Pea in Macon County, Alabama.
Relatives of the cow pea, they have a distinct nutty, pea-bean flavor.
Nearby stall owners also sell rice of every kind, whether colored with its bran, treated with spice such as turmeric or blue cow pea flowers, or varieties of glutinous rice for dinner or for sweet snacks.
The present investigation suggests that application of proline may help decrease the adverse effects of drought in cow pea.
The implementation programme resulted in increased conservation agricultural methods such as pearl millet, sorghum and cow pea by up to 500% at household level, boosting household food security.