Cox-2 inhibitor

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COX-2 inhibitor

n.
Any of a class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs that selectively block prostaglandin formation so as to cause minimal gastrointestinal side effects.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cox-2 inhibitor - an anti-inflammatory drug that fights pain and blocks Cox-2 activity without impeding the activity of Cox-1; increases the risk of heart attacks; "Cox-2 inhibitors reduce the symptoms of arthritis without endangering the stomach and kidneys"
anti-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory drug - a medicine intended to reduce inflammation
Celebrex, celecoxib - a Cox-2 inhibitor (trade name Celebrex) that relieves pain and inflammation without harming the digestive tract
rofecoxib, Vioxx - a Cox-2 inhibitor (trade name Vioxx) that relieves pain and inflammation without harming the digestive tract; voluntarily withdrawn from the market in 2004
Bextra, valdecoxib - a Cox-2 inhibitor (trade name Bextra) that relieves pain and inflammation without harming the digestive tract
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Curcumin is a natural COX2 inhibitor. Recently, a new form of curcumin became available, Meriva.
Therefore, salicin could predict as COX2 inhibitor selective and anti-cancerous compound [21].
(33) However, because celecoxib showed a severe suppression on NKX3.1 protein levels at its NF-[KAPPA]B inhibitory concentration, and also mild protection on AR and NKX3.1 without suppression of Akt phosphorylation at its lower concentrations in our results, we concluded that celecoxib was not an effective candidate among the commonly used selective COX2 inhibitors for cancer chemoprevention.
'Our study shows that COX2 inhibitors do have an effect on the tumor cells,' said the study's first author William Guerrant from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) in the US.