Coypel


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Coypel

(French kwapɛl)
n
(Biography) Antoine. 1661–1722, French baroque painter, noted esp for his large biblical compositions
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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(There are four or more each by the 'big names', Watteau, Nattier, Pater, Boucher, Greuze, Drouais, Fragonard, Robert, David, and few serious gaps.) How hard these dealers had to work is demonstrated by the early history (not in Baetjer) of the magnificent Coypel pastel, which Duveen sold in 1906 to a collector, Mrs T.
and the palace as setting for the collection." That includes court painter Antoine Coypel's oil "sketch" for the great gallery's ceiling.
Entre otras pinturas que comparten la centralidad del escudo podemos senalar obras tales como Perseo y Andromeda (1607-1608) de Pier Francesco Mazzucchelli, la copia renacentista que Tiziano Vecellio (1554-1556) realiza con oleo sobre lienzo de la obra anonima conocida como Andromeda y el dragon, el oleo de Charles Antoine Coypel (1694-1752) titulada Perseo rescata a Andromeda, y la misma escena recobrada por Piero di Cosimo (1513), Paolo Veronese (1576-1578), en casi todas las versiones de Cavaliere d'Arpino (1593-1594, 1594-1595, 1594-1598), Pier Francesco Morazzone (1610), Peter Paul Rubens (1636, 1638), Guido Reni (1635), Pieter Pottel (1642), Francois Lemoyne (1723) y Charles Andre van Loo (1735-1740).
late seventeenth century by Noel Coypel for the Gobelins workshop, and
Whereas it is helpful to contextualize the first and/or the most dominant representatives of each program in their sociopolitical context (take, for example, Coypel as representative of the French and Vanderbank as representative of the English), it is also the case that visual images in general, and prints in particular, circulated much more freely across national and linguistic boundaries than would a text.
Henry also considers Antoine Coypel. Patrick Absalon gives a clear analysis of the influence of the Italian Renaissance on some nineteenth-century French painters, such as Delacroix and Gustave Moreau.
Parisian painter Noel-Nicolas Coypel received many commissions from wealthy aristocrats.
On a political level it suggested arrogance and opportunism, while the cognoscenti would have recognised the literary reference to Coypel's engraving for Don Quixote, Sancho Panza's Entry as Governor of Barataria.
In keeping with the conventions of such French painters as Noel-Nicolas Coypel, his men are tawny and his women, as his three goddesses are here, twists of silver.