Crécy

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Cré·cy

 (krĕs′ē, krā-sē′)
A village of northern France northwest of Amiens. It was the site of the first decisive battle of the Hundred Years' War (August 26, 1346), in which Edward III of England defeated Philip VI of France.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Crécy

(ˈkrɛsɪ; French kresi)
n
(Placename) a village in N France: scene of the first decisive battle of the Hundred Years' War when the English defeated the French (1346). Official name: Crécy-en-Ponthieu Former English name: Cressy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Cré•cy

or Cres•sy

(ˈkrɛs i)

n.
a village in N France, NNW of Reims: English victory over the French 1346.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Crecy - the first decisive battle of the Hundred Years' WarCrecy - the first decisive battle of the Hundred Years' War; in 1346 the English under Edward III defeated the French under Philip of Valois
Hundred Years' War - the series of wars fought intermittently between France and England; 1337-1453
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
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