crack baby

(redirected from Crack babies)
Also found in: Medical.

crack baby

n.
An infant born to a mother who used crack cocaine during pregnancy.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The film is so harmless and lame, it's almost sweet -- but then, side-by-side with musical montages where the 'instant family' share tubs of ice-cream and play with water pistols, you hear talk of "crack babies" and abusive parents and the whole thing suddenly seems wildly inadequate.
Remember crack babies? Back in the 1980s, they were the infants supposedly doomed to a life of certain suffering, of probable deviance, of permanent inferiority.
These statements are among those he considers most damaging: "A person cannot overdose on alcohol." "Self-help (i.e, sheer willpower) is an appropriate way to overcome the disease of addiction." And, " 'Crack babies' are a major clinical problem."
Since there were babies being born addicted to crack in the 1980s, sometimes the 80s babies are referred to as crack babies. Being born in the 80s, in the crack baby era, we are crack babies.
Summarizing the results of a 25-year study of "crack babies," Hallam Hurt, the lead author and former chair of neonatology at Albert Einstein Medical Center and the study's lead researcher, concluded: "Poverty is a more powerful influence on the outcome of inner-city children than gestational exposure to cocaine" (Fitzgerald, 2013).
According to Michelle Alexander, the Reagan administration triggered a media campaign with images and reports of drug-ridden black communities and crack babies to garner support for drug policies that targeted African Americans.
Performers who have changed gender, lived on the streets or been branded "crack babies" all hope they've got what it takes to inspire Glee creator Ryan Murphy to write a character for them.
Auditionees who have changed gender, lived on the streets, or been branded "crack babies" all hope they've got what it takes to inspire Glee creator Ryan Murphy to write a character for them.
Wade and even positing that "crack babies" born to drug-addled mothers at the height of the crack cocaine epidemic in the 1980s and 1990s turned out to be not as physically damaged as first thought.
But just as the warnings about "crack babies" handicapped for life by their mothers' drug use turned out to be wildly overblown, there was less to this study than the press coverage suggested.
To a large extent, the prominence of CRACK rests on tacit understandings solidified by the images that garnered media attention during the 1990s crack "epidemic." Crack babies and drug-addicted mothers came to be defined as elements of a new emerging social problem: prenatal drug exposure (see Gomez, 1997; Maher, 1990).
I imagine that anyone who has ever worked in social care or in a maternity ward will have quite a different view from the pro-life, human rights supporters because they have delivered the crack babies and seen the neglect caused by addiction.