crack baby

(redirected from Crack babies)
Also found in: Medical.

crack baby

n.
An infant born to a mother who used crack cocaine during pregnancy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since there were babies being born addicted to crack in the 1980s, sometimes the 80s babies are referred to as crack babies.
According to Michelle Alexander, the Reagan administration triggered a media campaign with images and reports of drug-ridden black communities and crack babies to garner support for drug policies that targeted African Americans.
Crack babies and drug-addicted mothers came to be defined as elements of a new emerging social problem: prenatal drug exposure (see Gomez, 1997; Maher, 1990).
I imagine that anyone who has ever worked in social care or in a maternity ward will have quite a different view from the pro-life, human rights supporters because they have delivered the crack babies and seen the neglect caused by addiction.
He cites the last three generations for negligent parenting and points to leniency and a degradation of family morality as the reasons behind "today's homeless mentally unbalanced drug dependent crack babies unwed mothers welfare dependents abandoned children jail inmates functional illiterates 'ADHD' children and other physically and mentally maladjusted individuals.
No longer does talk about crack babies or Colombian drug lords dominate the nightly news.
Indeed, long-term studies of those infamous crack babies has found that their in utero drug exposure led to some behavioral problems, but not to the grotesque abnormalities predicted in the 1980s.
On the one hand is the mothers' constitutionally protected right against unreasonable searches, and on the other is society's interest in addressing the crisis of crack babies.
37) This backdrop of mother-blaming and regulation helps to explain the discovery of prenatal substance abuse as a social problem in the late 1980s, the news media's inflammatory rhetoric about crack babies, and the public's alarm about this so-called epidemic.
Some went so far as to claim that crack babies would have to be written off as a "lost generation" or a "biological underclass.
In the late 1980s public attention had turned from FAS babies on reservations to African American crack babies in the neonatal units at inner city hospitals.