guild

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guild

also gild  (gĭld)
n.
1.
a. An association of persons of the same trade or pursuits, formed to protect mutual interests and maintain standards.
b. A similar association, as of merchants or artisans, in medieval times.
2. Ecology A group of species in a community that use similar environmental resources in a similar way, such as a group of songbirds that all glean insects from leaves.

[Middle English gild, from Old Norse gildi, payment, guild.]

guild

(ɡɪld) or

gild

n
1. an organization, club, or fellowship
2. (Historical Terms) (esp in medieval Europe) an association of men sharing the same interests, such as merchants or artisans: formed for mutual aid and protection and to maintain craft standards or pursue some other purpose such as communal worship
3. (Botany) ecology a group of plants, such as a group of epiphytes, that share certain habits or characteristics
[C14: of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse gjald payment, gildi guild; related to Old English gield offering, Old High German gelt money]

guild

or gild

(gɪld)

n.
1. an organization of persons with related interests, goals, etc., esp. one formed for mutual aid or protection.
2. any of various medieval associations, as of merchants or artisans, organized for such purposes.
3. a group of plants, as parasites, having a similar habit of growth and nutrition.
[before 1000; Middle English gild(e), probably < Old Norse gildi guild, payment; akin to geld2]

Guild

 an association of men or women belonging to the same class or engaged in the same industry, profession, interested in the same leisure, literary, or other pursuit, etc. See also association, fraternity. Used also in such forms as Townwomen’s Guild, Guild of Woodworkers, etc.
Examples: guild of the learned, 1817; of Sibyls, 1871.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.guild - a formal association of people with similar interestsguild - a formal association of people with similar interests; "he joined a golf club"; "they formed a small lunch society"; "men from the fraternal order will staff the soup kitchen today"
association - a formal organization of people or groups of people; "he joined the Modern Language Association"
athenaeum, atheneum - a literary or scientific association for the promotion of learning
bookclub - a club that people join in order to buy selected books at reduced prices
chapter - a local branch of some fraternity or association; "he joined the Atlanta chapter"
chess club - a club of people to play chess
country club - a suburban club for recreation and socializing
frat, fraternity - a social club for male undergraduates
glee club - a club organized to sing together
golf club - a club of people to play golf
hunt club, hunt - an association of huntsmen who hunt for sport
investors club - a club of small investors who buy and sell securities jointly
jockey club - a club to promote and regulate horse racing
racket club - club for players of racket sports
rowing club - a club for rowers
slate club - a group of people who save money in a common fund for a specific purpose (usually distributed at Christmas)
sorority - a social club for female undergraduates
turnverein - a club of tumblers or gymnasts
boat club, yacht club - club that promotes and supports yachting and boating
service club - a club of professional or business people organized for their coordination and active in public services
club member - someone who is a member of a club

guild

guild

noun
A group of people united in a relationship and having some interest, activity, or purpose in common:
Translations
cech
lav
kilta
cechgildia
ceh

guild

[gɪld] Ngremio m

guild

[ˈgɪld] n
(HISTORY)corporation f
[writers, artists, craftsmen] → cercle m, association f

guild

n (Hist) → Zunft f, → Gilde f; (= association)Verein m

guild

[gɪld] n (History) → corporazione f, arte f, gilda; (club) → associazione f
References in periodicals archive ?
It's based on the Renaissance concept of craftsmanship and the idea of a master,'' says Gilmore, referring to the medieval craft guilds where young people apprenticed themselves to masters to learn a specific craft or trade.
She consults an impressive number of civic records to which she adds archaeological and some ecclesiastical evidence, all with an eye to examining the "role played by central government, urban authorities, craft guilds .
This understanding of virtue, of character and of apprenticeship were once central to the way in which people understood ethics and organisations from the medieval craft guilds to the Girl Guides were established in light of such understanding.
The formal indenture ceremony dates back to mediaeval times when the craft guilds ran a formal system - sometimes seven years long - when apprentice-employers and parents and guardians signed a contract following a probationary period when a recruit was found to be suitable to complete the course.
Coventry has an ancient and honourable tradition of craft guilds, one of which was the Cappers Guild, who as the name suggests, made caps.
Leaders of the City of Durham Freemen welcomed 11 new members into their eight surviving craft guilds, boosting numbers to a new high of 202 - topping 200 for the first time in living memory.
Here, he talks of defying the sceptics, teaching and how it felt to win a Craft Guilds award
In fact, the merchant guilds often sought to prohibit the craft guilds from trading and merchant activities.
While the emergence of mystery plays is still shrouded in mystery, (14) the work that craft guilds invested in staging and performing the York cycle is well documented.
In February 1488 he lacked the money to mobilize troops to hinder his imprisonment by the Bruges craft guilds.
Craft guilds in the early modern low countries; work, power and representation.
Technician societies flourished, so did craft guilds and bodies.