crag

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crag

 (krăg)
n.
A steep rugged mass of rock projecting upward or outward.

[Middle English, from Welsh craig or Scottish Gaelic creagh.]

crag′ged (krăg′ĭd) adj.

crag

(kræɡ)
n
(Physical Geography) a steep rugged rock or peak
[C13: of Celtic origin; related to Old Welsh creik rock]

Crag

(kræɡ)
n
(Geological Science) a formation of shelly sandstone in E England, deposited during the Pliocene and Pleistocene epochs

Crag

(kræɡ)
abbreviation for
carbon reduction action group or carbon rationing action group: a small association of citizens whose members attempt to reduce their environmental impact and are penalized if they exceed an agreed carbon budget

crag

(kræg)

n.
1. a steep, rugged rock.
2. a rough, broken, projecting part of a rock.
[1275–1325; Middle English < British Celtic]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crag - a steep rugged rock or cliffcrag - a steep rugged rock or cliff  
cliff, drop-off, drop - a steep high face of rock; "he stood on a high cliff overlooking the town"; "a steep drop"

crag

noun rock, peak, bluff, pinnacle, tor, aiguille The castle sits on a rocky crag above the town.
Translations
صَخْرَه، جُرْف شَديد الأنْحِدار
útes
klippefremspringstejl klippe
hamar; klettur
stati uolauolėtas
klints
pečinaskala
sarp kaya

crag

[kræg] Npeñasco m, risco m

crag

[ˈkræg] nrocher m escarpé

crag

nFels m

crag

[kræg] nrupe f

crag

(krӕg) noun
a rough, steep mountain or rock.
ˈcraggy adjective
rocky; rugged, irregular.
References in classic literature ?
The abrupt descent of Penistone Crags particularly attracted her notice; especially when the setting sun shone on it and the topmost heights, and the whole extent of landscape besides lay in shadow.
He has every snowy crest and the mountain peaks and rocky crests for his domain; hither and thither he goes through the close thickets, now lured by soft streams, and now he presses on amongst towering crags and climbs up to the highest peak that overlooks the flocks.
The Crow horsemen, as they escorted them, appeared to take pride in showing off their equestrian skill and hardihood; careering at full speed on their half-savage steeds, and dashing among rocks and crags, and up and down the most rugged and dangerous places with perfect ease and unconcern.
ejaculated the Pharisee, as the discordant tones of the centurion rattled up the crags of the precipice, and fainted away against the temple -"El Elohim
But the danger was past--they had landed at last, With their boxes, portmanteaus, and bags: Yet at first sight the crew were not pleased with the view, Which consisted to chasms and crags.
We passed through a range of wild, picturesque hills, steep, wooded, cone-shaped, with rugged crags projecting here and there, and with dwellings and ruinous castles perched away up toward the drifting clouds.
Nearer still, following the drift, an iceberg rears its crags and pinnacles to the sky; here, glittering in the moonbeams; there, looming dim and ghost-like in the ashy light.
Eventually, he hid himself away, on the heights of Mount Pilatus, and dwelt alone among the clouds and crags for years; but rest and peace were still denied him, so he finally put an end to his misery by drowning himself.
Behind him, blacker than the sea, blacker than the sky, rose phantom-like the vast stone structure, whose projecting crags seemed like arms extended to seize their prey, and on the highest rock was a torch lighting two figures.
But, there remained a broken country, bold and open, a little village at the bottom of the hill, a broad sweep and rise beyond it, a church- tower, a windmill, a forest for the chase, and a crag with a fortress on it used as a prison.
They accord with the nature of such scenery, and add much to its romantic effect; bounding like goats from crag to crag, often trooping along the lofty shelves of the mountains, under the guidance of some venerable patriarch with horns twisted lower than his muzzle, and sometimes peering over the edge of a precipice, so high that they appear scarce bigger than crows; indeed, it seems a pleasure to them to seek the most rugged and frightful situations, doubtless from a feeling of security.
I struck straight into the heath; I held on to a hollow I saw deeply furrowing the brown moorside; I waded knee-deep in its dark growth; I turned with its turnings, and finding a moss-blackened granite crag in a hidden angle, I sat down under it.