crake

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Related to Crakes: corncrake

crake

 (krāk)
n.
Any of several short-billed birds of the family Rallidae, such as the corncrake.

[Middle English, crow, probably from Old Norse krāka; see gerə- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

crake

(kreɪk)
n
(Zoology) zoology any of several rails that occur in the Old World, such as the corncrake and the spotted crake
[C14: from Old Norse krāka crow or krākr raven, of imitative origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

crake

(kreɪk)

n.
any of several short-billed rails, as the corn crake.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Old Norse krākr, krāki crow1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crake - any of several short-billed Old World railscrake - any of several short-billed Old World rails
rail - any of numerous widely distributed small wading birds of the family Rallidae having short wings and very long toes for running on soft mud
corncrake, Crex crex, land rail - common Eurasian rail that frequents grain fields
Porzana porzana, spotted crake - Eurasian rail of swamps and marshes
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

crake

nRalle f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
do you think Sir John Crake, the master of the harriers, knows Latin?" said Tom, who had often thought he should like to resemble Sir John Crake.
"Oh, well, I can do that, then," said Tom, not with any epigrammatic intention, but with serious satisfaction at the idea that, as far as Latin was concerned, there was no hindrance to his resembling Sir John Crake. "Only you're obliged to remember it while you're at school, else you've got to learn ever so many lines of 'Speaker.' Mr.
However spotted crakes are brown in colour, with white flecks on their backs and white spots on their breast.
The kayaks, with their ability to get up close and amongst the tangles of floating vegetation, would seem ideal for spotting the rails and crakes, a notoriously difficult group of wetland birds.
Eight adult black-tailed crakes of either sex used in the study were obtained from paddy field of Qujing, near the Qujing Normal University.
The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook packs in over a hundred recipes from mystery authors, and lends an element of investigate mystery into the finer art of cooking, whether you're planning a sinister dinner party or looking at the unlikely idea of crab crakes that comes from a Chinese-Korean American who writes historical mysteries.
Cris Pettit has been hired as personal lines account manager at Smith and Crakes Inc.
The little river Wellbrook, the ditches and ponds, the crakes and snipe and herons, the elms and mulberry trees, Paul Pindar's deer park, the inmates of Bedlam and the starving paupers of Angel Alley, Peter Street, Sweet Apple Court, and Swan Yard had all gone, and gone now too are the millions and millions of people who passed through Broadgate and Liverpool Str eet stations day in, day out, for an entire century.
RARE spotted crakes - relatives of the moorhen and coot - have been seen in Somerset, Dorset and Cheshire on their way to Africa from their breeding grounds in the marshes of Europe.