vagus nerve

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vagus nerve

n.
Either of the tenth and longest of the cranial nerves, passing through the neck and thorax into the abdomen and supplying sensation to part of the ear, the tongue, the larynx, and the pharynx, motor impulses to the vocal cords, and motor and secretory impulses to the abdominal and thoracic viscera. Also called pneumogastric nerve.

[New Latin (nervus) vagus, wandering (nerve), from Latin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

va·gus nerve

(vā′gəs)
A long nerve that passes from the brain to the face, trunk, and abdomen. It controls the muscles of the larynx (voice box), stimulates digestion, and regulates the heartbeat. The vagus nerve is a cranial nerve.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vagus nerve - a mixed nerve that supplies the pharynx and larynx and lungs and heart and esophagus and stomach and most of the abdominal visceravagus nerve - a mixed nerve that supplies the pharynx and larynx and lungs and heart and esophagus and stomach and most of the abdominal viscera
cranial nerve - any of the 12 paired nerves that originate in the brain stem
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Vagusnerv
References in periodicals archive ?
The vagus nerve (aka Cranial Nerve X or, more poetically, the Wandering Nerve) plays a crucial role in all of these essential functions, linking brain and organs in what's called the nervous system's superhighway.
When it occurs, the radiologist should examine the neck for the presence of a lesion along the course of the vagus nerve (cranial nerve X), which passes through the pars nervosa of the jugular foramen and along the carotid sheath.
The branch that connects the VIIth cranial nerve with the lesser petrosal nerve (from cranial nerve IX) apparently carries small myelinated fibers that contain interspersed autonomic fibers from the auricular branch of cranial nerve X. In addition, by 26 nun the embryo develops first-order ductules of the parotid primordium, which lies next to the masseter muscle, and several branches of the facial nerve course superficial to it.