Craters of the Moon


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Related to Craters of the Moon: Pikes Peak

Cra′ters of the Moon′


n.
a national monument in S Idaho: site of scenic lava-flow formations.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Think of all the things he discovered: the four brighter moons of Jupiter, mountains and craters of the moon, the phases of Venus, and thousands of new stars along the Milky Way.
Craters of the Moon National Monument is an out-of-this-world place.
Formed by lava flows, Craters of the Moon National Monument's moonscape quality saw it used as a training area for early US astronauts.
* Hitchcock would have loved making a movie at Craters of the Moon National Monument in the winter: the landscape is already a stark black and white; temperamental actors would think twice about stomping off the set into the middle of nowhere; and there's a ready-made air of mystery about the place.
AT first sight, Craters of the Moon, located at the base of the Pioneer Mountains, 18 miles west of Arco, ID, looks like an awful wasteland, desolate and strange, stark and forbidding.
The best way to see these astronomical wonders up close is through the powerful telescopes housed in Coats Observatory, from which you can see the rings of Saturn, the seas and craters of the Moon and the amazing red disc of planet Mars.
The influential story was widely read and played a key role in the creation of Craters of the Moon National Monument, which was established later the same year.
Mars is a terrestrial planet with a thin atmosphere and surface features similar to the impact craters of the Moon and the volcanoes, valleys, deserts, and polar ice caps of Earth.
One of the best places on Earth to find these lunar analogs is the Craters of the Moon National Monument & Preserve (CoM) in the Snake River Plain of Idaho.
The best way to see the night sky up close is through the powerful telescopes housed in Coats Observatory, from which you can see the rings of Saturn, the seas and craters of the Moon and the extraordinary red disc of planet Mars.