fundamentalism

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fun·da·men·tal·ism

 (fŭn′də-mĕn′tl-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. A usually religious movement or point of view characterized by a return to fundamental principles, by rigid adherence to those principles, and often by intolerance of other views and opposition to secularism.
2.
a. often Fundamentalism An organized, militant Evangelical movement originating in the United States in the late 1800s and early 1900s in opposition to Protestant Liberalism and secularism, insisting on the inerrancy of Scripture.
b. Adherence to the theology of this movement.

fun′da·men′tal·ist adj. & n.
fun′da·men′tal·ist′ic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fundamentalism

(ˌfʌndəˈmɛntəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity (esp among certain Protestant sects) the belief that every word of the Bible is divinely inspired and therefore true
2. (Islam) Islam a movement favouring strict observance of the teachings of the Koran and Islamic law
3. strict adherence to the fundamental principles of any set of beliefs
ˌfundaˈmentalist n, adj
ˌfundaˌmentalˈistic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fun•da•men•tal•ism

(ˌfʌn dəˈmɛn tlˌɪz əm)

n.
1. (sometimes cap.) a movement in American Protestantism that arose in the early part of the 20th century in reaction to Modernism and that stresses the infallibility of the Bible not only in matters of faith and morals but also as a literal historical record.
2. the beliefs held by those in this movement.
3. strict adherence to any set of basic ideas or principles.
[1920–25, Amer.]
fun`da•men′tal•ist, n., adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

fundamentalism

1. a conservative movement in 20th-century American Protestantism in reaction to modernism, asserting especially the inerrancy of the Scriptures as a historical record and as a guide to faith and morals, and emphasizing, as matters of true faith, belief in the virgin birth, the sacrifice and death of Christ upon the cross, physical resurrection, and the Second Coming.
2. an adherence to the doctrines and practices of this movement. — fundamentalist, n., adj.
See also: Protestantism
the rationale of conservative American Protestants who regard the Bible as free of errors or contradictions and emphasize its literal interpretation, usually without reference to modern scholarship. Also called literalism. — fundamentalist, n., adj.
See also: Bible
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fundamentalism - the interpretation of every word in the sacred texts as literal truth
Protestantism - the theological system of any of the churches of western Christendom that separated from the Roman Catholic Church during the Reformation
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
fundamentalismus
fundamentalizam
fundamentalismus
fundamentalisme
fundamentalism

fundamentalism

[ˌfʌndəˈmentəlɪzəm] Nfundamentalismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fundamentalism

[ˌfʌndəˈmɛntəlɪzəm] n (religious)intégrisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fundamentalism

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fundamentalism

[ˌfʌndəˈmɛntəˌlɪzm] nfondamentalismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
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Some members of Congress use it to energize the crazy base.
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During an appearance on "The Daily Show" Jon Stewart asked McCain if he will "go off to Crazy Base World" to win over conservatives, McCain said "I am afraid I am".